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Offline Shemoeley Fine

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Re: Music
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2006, 08:29:59 PM »
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  • Fine Bari <<< I worked in one of the greatest used record stores in the country for 7 years! It's Jerry's in Pittsburgh (used to be in Oakland, hen moved out to Squirrel Hill). >>>>>>

    There's a Pittsburgh in both No Cal and Pennsylvania, so where is this store located? I am a vinyl junklie so I am always on the lookout for new places to dig through the crates.

    S F
    Los Tres Chiflados son The Three Stooges
    Ma'. Lorenzito y Rizzado

    Offline FineBari3

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #26 on: January 25, 2006, 08:48:15 AM »
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  • Fine Bari <<< I worked in one of the greatest used record stores in the country for 7 years! It's Jerry's in Pittsburgh (used to be in Oakland, hen moved out to Squirrel Hill). >>>>>>

    There's a Pittsburgh in both No Cal and Pennsylvania, so where is this store located? I am a vinyl junklie so I am always on the lookout for new places to dig through the crates.

    S F

    The Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania. You know, the one with the football team thats going to the SUPER BOWL!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    (Sorry, I normally don't gloat....but its the SUPER BOWL!!!).   [dance]
    Mar-Jean Zamperini
    "Moe is their leader." -Homer Simpson

    Offline Shemoeley Fine

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #27 on: January 25, 2006, 09:00:25 AM »
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  • In response to my query about the location of Jerry's Records, FineBari wrote <<< The Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania. You know, the one with the football team thats going to the SUPER BOWL!!!!!!!!!!!!! (Sorry, I normally don't gloat....but its the SUPER BOWL!!!).>>>

    I thought so,  but because you also mentioned Oakland I wasn't sure as I didn't realize that there's an Oakland in PA too, seems like quite a coincidence that both the Golden State and the Keystone State have a Pittsburgh and an Oakland in close proximity to each other.

    My cousin lives in Denver and he is distraught about the Steelers destruction of the Broncos, it was one thing to lose but the Broncos weren't competitive. I hope the Steelers beat the Seahawks in an exciting game....

    The last time I was in Pittsburgh PA, maybe 10-12 years ago, I was taken to the warehouse district late at night where the truckers congregate to have one of those famous sandwiches where they place the fries in the sandwich with the meat and veggies......pretty good with an Iron City beer to wash it down.

    S F
    Los Tres Chiflados son The Three Stooges
    Ma'. Lorenzito y Rizzado

    Offline Giff me dat fill-em!

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #28 on: January 28, 2006, 01:58:48 PM »
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  • Saturday Night's Alright for Fighting - Elton John
    I'm a juvenile product of the working class
    Who's best friend floats in the bottom of a glass


    I know ... this is another one of those "poetic licence" things, but we all know this "friend" is the worm in the tequila bottle, and we also know it doesn't "float" in the bottom of the glass. Anything that is floating will NOT be at the bottom.

    And another technical nitpick,  the Yellow Brick Road album supplies the buyer with an insert that prints all the lyrics to the songs contained on the album. The quoted lyrics for "Saturday Night" has them printed just as seen above, yet it is misspelled, because in the context of the song, the "who" is asserting that their best friend was a worm, and in that case, it should be whose. Just to reinforce the point, here is the dictionary definition of the two words:

    Whose - the possessive form of who
    Who's - a contraction of who is or who has
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    Offline Shemoeley Fine

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #29 on: February 08, 2006, 04:51:45 PM »
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  • Here's another case of poetic license by one of the finest composers of the "Tin Pan Alley" era.  The song in question is from the pen of Lorenz Hart and is titled "Manhattan", check out the line **** from the verse...

    We'll have Manhattan,
    The Bronx and Staten
    Island too.
    It's lovely going through
    The zoo.
    It's very fancy
    On old Delancey
    Street, you know.
    The subway charms us so
    When balmy breezes blow
    To and fro.
    ***** And tell me what street
    Compares with Mott Street ****
    In July?
    Sweet pushcarts gently gliding by.
    The great big city's a wondrous toy
    Just made for a girl and boy.
    We'll turn Manhattan
    Into an isle of joy.

    That should be which street, however it is obvious it wouldn't ryhme with Mott Street. I have known this song for many moons and have heard dozens of jazz versions of it, this morning on my local public radio station that plays jazz, I heard a terriific version by the Queen of the Blues-Dinah Washington.  As soon it came on, I immediately thought of this thread.  The program host said Manhattan was written for a Broadway play, Garrett Gayeties, from the 1920's.

    S F
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    Ma'. Lorenzito y Rizzado

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #30 on: February 08, 2006, 10:15:54 PM »
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  • As a native Manhattanite, I can tell you that there isn't any street there with a name that rhymes with "which." No Itch Street or Snitch Street or Bitch Street or whatever. So, there's nothing wrong with this little bit of poetic license. Except for the northernmost and southernmost parts of the island, the vast majority of the streets have numbers instead of names, anyway. Interesting sidelight on that: back in the 1950's, the city government decided to change the name of Sixth Avenue to Avenue of the Americas, in honor of the United Nations. This idea may have looked good on paper, but it failed miserably in practice, because the stubborn Noo Yawkers went right on calling it Sixth Avenue, which they still do to this day.

    Rodgers and Hart is one of my favorite songwriting teams, very urbane and sophisticated— but later on when Richard Rodgers teamed up with Oscar Hammerstein as lyricist, they started writing sappy stuff like "South Pacfic" and "The Sound of Music." Both shows were big Broadway and film hits, but they're not my cup of borscht. My favorite Rodgers and Hart song, by the way, is "You Took Advantage Of Me," especially the 1928 recording by Paul Whiteman with Bing Crosby, Frankie Trumbauer, and Bix Beiderbecke. If I ever get to do a Pilsner's Picks again (hi there, Rob!), I'll find some reason to post it.

    Offline Shemoeley Fine

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #31 on: February 09, 2006, 12:08:53 AM »
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  • Pils wrote <<< As a native Manhattanite, I can tell you that there isn't any street there with a name that rhymes with "which." No Itch Street or Snitch Street or Bitch Street or whatever >>>>

    Aaaaaaah but I believe there is, the southern extension of 8th Avenue is Greenwich St, doesn't it rhyme with which?
    I know of this street because I have a uncle and aunt who lived in Chelsea, 8th Ave and 15th St. I used to visit them often in the summers of the 60's and 70's to hang with the NY branch of my family. My cousins would take me to a great hamburger joint on 8th Ave and 13th St, the White Tower, competitors to White Castle(IMO much better). Often we would then walk south to Bleecker St and into the Village as 8th Ave turned into Greenwich. 14th Street is the dividing line between Greenwich Village and Chelsea, the north side is Chelsea, the south side is the Village, Moreover, 14th Street between 8th and 7th Avenues has an added designation, Little Spain, because of the abundance of Spanish(from Spain) businesses that were situated there from the 1920's Pan American movement until the  early 80's. Every August in conjunction with the birthday of the patron saint of Spain, Santiago de Compostela, they would close the street to have a Little Spain Street Festival complete with simulated bullfights, flamenco music-dancers, food, sangria etc etc.

    I have often noted that to this day Avenue of the Americas still has double street signs, 6th Ave and Ave of the Americas. Many businesses also list both names for the avenue.  After the change of government in Cuba in 1959, many buildings, parks, streets, squares etc were renamed, yet as in NYC, the people continued to refer to them in their original names and to this date, several generations later, although they may be officialy called one thing, everybody knows them by their previous names as well, a completely binomial occurence.

    Even if there was a street in Manhattan with an exact rhyme to which, Mott Street, in particular at the time the song was written was a street that had many stores and much activity as did Delancy St, streets in the Lower East Side which are the objects of Lorenz Hart's attention.

    I like walking on 6th Av in the Village and seeing the "flags" of the Americas painted on shields that hang from the street lights. My favorite pizza slice in the whole city is the Original Ray's Pizza on 6th and 11th St, talk about extra cheese.

    Are you sure Avenue of the Americas was named in honor of the UN?  The UN includes nations beyond the Americas.

    Finally, thanx for the easy instructions even a Bonehead like me could understand.....

    S F

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #32 on: February 09, 2006, 12:22:17 AM »
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    Pils wrote <<< As a native Manhattanite, I can tell you that there isn't any street there with a name that rhymes with "which." No Itch Street or Snitch Street or Bitch Street or whatever >>>>

    Aaaaaaah but I believe there is, the southern extension of 8th Avenue is Greenwich St, doesn't it rhyme with which?


    Nope. The name is pronounced "Grennich," not "Green-witch," just like the original town in England (famous, of course, for Greenwich Mean Time).

    By the way, I think these are the silliest lines in what's still a great song:

    "The subway charms us so
    When balmy breezes blow
    To and fro."

    The last word I'd ever think of to describe the Subway is "charming," and whatever's blowing down there, it sure isn't balmy breezes!

    [pound]

    Glad to help out on the picture.

     :)

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    Offline Shemoeley Fine

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    Re: Music, 6th/Americas Ave history
    « Reply #33 on: February 09, 2006, 09:44:30 AM »
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  • Here's what I discovered about the renaming of Manhattan's 6th Avenue to Avenue of Americas: << Also known as 6th Avenue, which former Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia renamed in honor of the country in 1945, is one of New York City's busiest streets. >>  This was supplied by writer John P. Adamski in his site, History of NYC street names.

    I talked to my NYC cousin early this morning,  a life-long Manhattanite who considers The Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens as suburbs, Staten Island, Jersey and Long Island as the wilderness. Heck, to him Manhattan, north of the GWB is the country.  He is a citizen of concrete and cacaphony.  Anyhoooo, he told me about a great site that has an illustrated history of 6th Avenue complete with 2 pix of the "hanging streetlight shields" dipicting the nations of America.     http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%20SCENES/deepsix/deepsix.html   I attempted to include a pix of one but couldn't figure out how to do it without making it an attachment, a no-no for this site. Regardless, for any NYC history buffs the site is chock full of great info and pix. By the way, decades before Starsucks, NYC had Chock Full Of Nuts coffee shops dotting the landscape.  Pils are you old enough to remember Nedick's stands?

    S F



    Los Tres Chiflados son The Three Stooges
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    Re: Music
    « Reply #34 on: February 10, 2006, 04:40:53 PM »
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  • I have a sort of vague memory of Nedick's, but I think they were all gone by the time I was five or six years old. There was a similar stand in my neighborhood, though, Gray's Papaya at 72nd and Broadway; specialized in papaya juice, orange juice, and hot dogs, and I think it's still there.

    Offline Shemoeley Fine

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #35 on: February 10, 2006, 06:54:55 PM »
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  • Pils wrote <<< Gray's Papaya at 72nd and Broadway; specialized in papaya juice, orange juice, and hot dogs, and I think it's still there. >>>

    Yes sir, it's still there and still the best hot dogs around, better than runner up-Nathan's.  Besides great franks and delicioso juices like piña colada, their namesake papaya and others they are very inexpensive. I was in the City for 3 days in early December, my first voyage back to the Apple since 9-11 and I was surprised to see Gray's Papaya  on the East Side, West Side, all around the town, they are now like Starsucks, ubiquitous.

    Pils, here's another old timer New York memory for you I am sure you've heard abou. When my family first arrived to the USA in the mid 50's, we lived in NYC until 1960 when we moved here to So Cal and I recall going to what they called "automats", I believe Horn and Hardat's Automat where all the food and beverages were behind revolving glass shelving, you would insert the proper coin amount into the slots and voila!, you could slide open the compartment that had the item you selected, then go and sit down and enjoy them.

    By the way, Nedick's had the best orange and grape drinks served in paper cones placed into plastic cone holders. Another adolescent memory of mine from the City was the Levy's Bread billboards seen on buses and subway stations, "You don't have to be Jewish to like Levy's Rye Bread", they would have a picture of different kids eating a slice of bread, Asian, Black, sub-continent Indian, Latino etc etc  I also remember hearing radio ads for Schaeffer Beer that had the following, "In New York, where there are more Italians than in Rome, Italy, more Italians drink Schaeffer than other beer" or "In New York, where there are more Puerto Ricans than in San Juan, Puerto Rico,  more Puerto Ricans drink Schaeffer than other beer", there were 2 or 3 other groups mentioned as well.

    Finally, I remember my parents, aunts and uncles, taking a group of 7 or 8 of their children, all of us cousins, to the Statue of Liberty in either 1957 or 1958, I was 8 years old, and we were able to climb up her arm and outside to the platform surrounding the torch. A year or 2 afterwards, that was closed to the public and the crown-window viewing area was as high up one could go. The Alfred Hitchcock mid-40's movie, Sabatouer has a recreation of the torch platform in the film's thrilling finale.

    There are 7 million stories in the Naked City, this has been one of them.


    S F
    Los Tres Chiflados son The Three Stooges
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    Offline SugarBee19

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #36 on: February 18, 2006, 01:22:18 AM »
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  • Stevie Wonder was NOT born blind:

     
    Stevie Wonder was born premature and placed in an incubator. He was given high levels of oxygen to sustain his life. He suffered from the blinding disease known as retinopathy of prematurity, or ROP.

    Very premature babies don't have properly formed blood vessels in the retina, the eye's innermost layer. Sudden exposure to oxygen as doctors attempt to save these babies is believed to cut off further blood vessel formation. Then there's a backlash: Blood-starved retinal tissue sends out an urgent call for help that results in sudden growth of abnormal blood vessels, eventually causing vision-blocking retina scars and even detachment.

    So, Stevie Wonder wasn't actually born blind, but suffered from ROP.


    http://www.answerbag.com/c_view.php/1312#q_4231

    Offline JazzBill

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #37 on: March 04, 2006, 09:53:47 PM »
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  • As I was reading this category I came upon a post where Shemoeley Fine mentions Louis Jordan. Louis is the reason I go by the name JazzBill. I was watching the movie Swing Parade Of 1946. It wasn't all that good but the Stooges were in it so I felt obligated to watch it thru. Gale Storm and Phil Regan didn't do much for me but then came Louis Jordan, he blew me away. This guy did everything , he sang, he danced and he played the sax. HE ROCKED, I thought I found some hidden treasure .Only later did I find out that he was put into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, the 2nd Year of inductions. I then started digging deeper into the whole Big Band - Swing era. Thats when I found Benny Goodman, Lionel Hamton, Count Basie, Jack Teagarden, Harry James ,etc. So not only did the Stooges give me something to watch, they also give me something to listen to.
    "When in Chicago call Stockyards 1234, Ask for Ruby".

    Offline Shemoeley Fine

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #38 on: March 05, 2006, 12:38:21 PM »
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  • Jazz Bill wrote <<<< but then came Louis Jordan, he blew me away. This guy did everything , he sang, he danced and he played the sax. HE ROCKED, I thought I found some hidden treasure .Only later did I find out that he was put into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, the 2nd Year of inductions. >>>>>

    I hate having to pull the R card out but when it comes to the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame, it has to be done. Not only should Louis Jordan been on the very first induction, he should have been crowned the true and official
    King of Rock n Roll, not the E man, not Billy Haley nor Chuck Berry or Little Richard. Louis played in several big bands of the Swing era of pre-WW2, he was a fine player. After WW2 the big band era came to an end due to increasing travel costs making it difficult for most big bands to continue although there were a few exceptions, Duke, Count, Woody Herman and a very few others managed to survive although their peak of popularity waned.
    In Los Angeles' famed Central Avenue District there were many clubs like the Alabam, Jungle Room, Barrelhouse and others where Louis Jordan and other swing era-big band members led small groups they called combos  that had the swing of the big bands in a small group, 5, 6 or 7 musicians, of which most inlcuding a guitarist, an electrified one at that.  Most of the musicans in Los Angeles were from Texas or Oklahoma where the blues jumped and swung. Aaron "T-Bone" Walker was the most prominent of the guitarists, known for having a 25 foot extensions cord attached to his axe so he could walk outside of the club he played unto the street to attract customers inside. Other fine 'git-tar' players of the era were Pee Wee Crayton, Lowell Fulson, "Guitar" Lewis, Jimmy Nolen and others including a young precursor to Jimi Hendrix in the early 1950's Johnny "Guitar" Watson. The added a certain grit to the  combos that the dancers loved. That's is where and how Rock n Roll truly began. In the early 1950's a few years after the L A scene was well established a similar process was happening in the Memphis area to a lesser extent where Ike Turner's combo made a fabulous record titled "Rocket 88" in 1951 with a fine guitar solo that in its final coda blew out the amp causing a odd sound that was left in the recording that helped make it a huge seller and for it to be cited as one of, if not the first Rock n Roll recording.

    Listen to the music of Louis Jordan of post-WW2, you'll hear rapping n rhyming, great guitar solos, back beat shuffles-all the ingredients of rock n roll. Louis was the first video star as well as he was the most popular artist of soundies-the first videos for both Black and White audiences.

    Meanwhile back on the rancho of LA's Central Avenue, artist like the brothers Liggins, Jimmy and Joe- Roy Brown, Big Joe Turner, Amos Milburn and many others polished their combos to shine bright with the yet unamed but clearly identified new dance sounds of jump blues and RnB alongside the burgeoning vocal harmony group scene a decade plus later to be mis-christened "doo-wop"

    In 1954 in Cleveland, home of the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame classical music disc jockey Alan Freed noticed that white teens were buying 45's of Black artists and learned they were listening to Black AM radio stations at the end of the dial late at night where this music was being played. Seeing an opportunity to make money $$, Alan petitined his radio station to allow him to begin playing these RnB artists and songs but Alan knew that RnB had negative connotations in both Black and White communities as Whites viewed it a "nigra music", "jungle sounds", a way to lower the White man to the Black man's level with all the lewd rhythms and double entendre of the music. Blacks frowned upon RnB and jump blues as the "devil's music" because it was not gospel and the lyrics were suggestive sexually and also sang about drinking and partying. Alan Fredd after hearing how often the words rock and roll were used individualy and collectively named the music he played Rock N Roll after a few months of calling it the Big Beat. By the way there are recordings dating back to the 1920's where rock n roll are used individually and or collectively, in Black street slang rock or roll meant a romp in the sack, yup you guessed it, sex! In 1925 there's a blues sang by a female titled, "My Man Rocks Me With One Steady Roll" and the list of lyrics goes on from there. Heck, even Ferdinand "Jelly Roll" Morton, a New Orleans pioneer of jazz who proclaimed himself(erroneously) as THEE creator of jazz, gave himself that nickname because of his notorioty of being a pimp and supposedely a well endowed ladies man. I guess he loved rolling and rocking in the jellyroll of his ladies.

    In 1959, the payola scandals broke out during the annual convention of Rock n Roll or Pop radio in Miami Beach, it ruined the career of Alna Freed who had taken his Moondog Show to NYC radio in 1956 after blowing up in Cleveland, he launched the carreer of many an artist through his radio shows, his movies and live stage shows. Meanwhile a squeaky clean young boyish looking man out of Philadelphia got away scott free although he was as guilty as Freed of taking money to play songs on the radio and accepting favors from record labels, this led the way for he to become the leading proponent, dee jay and TV host of Rock N Roll, Dick Clark.

    When the Rock n Roll Museum opened in Clevland it should've had the true story of rock n roll with all the mothers and fathers, godfathers and godmothers prominently honored with their stories instead of succumbing to the big coporate sponsorship and the perpetuation of myths relagating the actual creators and pioneers to back of the bus, second degree citizenry status if remembered at all. That's why you wont see my face in the place.

    I am part of a committee here in So Cal to correct the myths and establish a museum along the Central Avenue corridor that will give merit to the actual heroes in the actual place that made it all possible.

    S F
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    Ma'. Lorenzito y Rizzado

    Offline Giff me dat fill-em!

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #39 on: March 31, 2006, 09:43:37 AM »
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  • Let Her In was released in 1976, during John Travolta's second season as Vinny Barbarino on Welcome Back Kotter, a good two years before his "singing" movie appearance in Grease. If the movie producers chose John based on his performance on THIS song, they must've been thinking they'd send him to voice lessons, his singing on this song sucks!




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    Re: Music
    « Reply #40 on: April 12, 2006, 04:44:00 PM »
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  • 1. Boogie On Reggae Woman - Stevie Wonder
    Maybe Pilsner can answer this one ... Why would Stevie tell a reggae woman to "boogie on"?
    "Boogie" is a general term that can mean a number of things, not all of them related to music. Musically speaking, it's a piano-based style, with eight beats to the bar of music rather than the standard four beats to the bar of Swing; this is what gives it a kind of rushed, excited quality, especially in the hands of the greatest Boogie-Woogie keyboard players like Albert Ammons and Pete Johnson.

    I've found another reference to "Boogie" that may be a little off the beaten path ...  :o :P

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #41 on: June 08, 2006, 12:27:05 AM »
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  • Here is a generalized nitpick about "Corn-try" music ... a self-negating tune about a guy who decides he must leave his girl, but can't think of any goddammed reason why.

    I ain't never been with a woman long enough
    For my boots to get old
    We've been together so long now
    They both need resoled

    If I ever settle down
    You'd be my kind
    And it's a good time for me
    To head on down the line


    Heard it in a love song (3x)
    Can't be wrong

    I'm the kinda man likes to get away
    Like to start dreaming about
    Tomorrow, today
    Never said that I love you
    even though its so
    Where's that duffle bag of mine?
    It's time to go

    Heard it in a love song (3x)
    Can't be wrong


    I'm gonna be leaving
    At the break of dawn
    Wish you could come
    But I don't need no woman taggin along
    I'll sneak out that door
    Couldn't stand to see you cry
    I stay another year if I saw teardrops in your eyes

    Heard it in a love song (3x)
    Can't be wrong

    I never had a damn thing, but what I had
    I had to leave it behind
    You're the hardest thing
    I ever tried to get off of my mind
    Always something greener on the other side of that hill
    I was born wrangler and a rambler
    and I guess I always will

    Heard it in a love song (3x)
    Can't be wrong


    Contradictions abound in this stupid tune. First, the guy states he's NEVER been with a woman long enough for his boots to wear out, yet in the very next statement, he proclaims his current wench has worn his heels off. THEN, he says he'd consider settling down with her, but he's gotta dash off jus' now. And the tag line "Heard it in a long song ... cain't be wrong" is just ignorant. Who, except a hayseed chewin' barnyard shit-kicker would believe ANYTHING he/she heard from the lyrics of a song right off the cuff as gospel truth? Also, "Like to start dreaming about tomorrow, today" ... DUH!!! When ELSE would you dream about tomorrow!? And finally, "I was born a wrangler and a rambler, and I guess I always will". This dufus is proclaiming that he'll always do what he was inately endowed to do ... once again, DUH!

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #42 on: June 08, 2006, 10:08:35 PM »
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  • I can't believe that that John Travolta song has been downloaded 32 times to date... there must be a lot of Scientologists out there!

     ::)

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #43 on: June 08, 2006, 11:52:32 PM »
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  • Be not so down, Senior Panther, perhaps it was because I gave the tune such a rotten review that made the patrons download the song, and perhaps NOT because they ALL want to "Jump The Couch".
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    Re: Music
    « Reply #44 on: August 26, 2006, 11:37:06 PM »
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  • Here's a tune that deserves scrutiny - that being a song from the well-deserved "King of Western Swing" himself ... Bob Wills. The man and his band, The Texas Playboys, made for themselves a rich fortune and legacy by being the premier swing band for a country-western audience.

    However, THIS song definitely has its roots in the Black American art of Scat - i.e., the art of vocalizing either wordlessly or with nonsense words and syllables, and thus becomes a sort-of "voice instrumental".

    One can tell by this song that Bob spent a few nights in a nightclub somewhere sipping margaritas and manhattans while listening to the local talent. And, the way Bob and his band sings it, the song title should be Fo' Five Times.

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #45 on: September 27, 2006, 12:39:05 AM »
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  • Here’s a nitpick that has been a burr under my saddle blanket for years.
    The tune Freddy Feelgood (And His Funky Little Five-Piece Band) sung by Ray Stevens in 1969 contains lyrics that are a slap in the face to any music lover that has taken the time to learn how to read music.

    The offending lyrics are thus:
    A cat named Percy,
    Have Mercy,
    Plays piano in the Treble Clef


    Viewing a piano keyboard from a player’s perspective, normally, the left hand is relegated to the “higher” notes, and the right hand the “lower” notes. The “higher” notes are usually written on the Treble Clef, and the “lower” ones on the Bass Clef, and hence the term “Middle C” becomes clear, because it is the note that is exactly between both clefs. Piano music is normally written in both clefs so that the piano player can know what to do with both hands in order to perform the piece.
    NOW, if our beloved Percy plays only in the Treble Clef, then either:
    1. He is missing his right arm and cannot perform the music properly
    2. He re-writes all music he performs so that all the notes appear in the Treble Clef, which would make it a high-pitched piece of music, to be sure
    The piece of music Percy plays for us when he is introduced certainly sounds like he is using both hands and playing in both clefs, but that’s mere opinion on my part.

    A minor nitpick occurs earlier in the tune, when Yum-Yum (the drummer) is described as “Blows real cool, makes all the girls drool”. As far as I know, there are NO percussion instruments that must be blown into to make music with them. A xylophone and a vibraphone use air in making music, but the instrument is still struck with mallets, and not blown into.

    In spite of all, I love the tune anyway.

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #46 on: October 20, 2006, 01:41:39 AM »
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  • The tune The Devil Went Down To Georgia performed by The Charlie Daniels Band asserts that the Devil (in his/her/its infinite wisdom) promises to the young man a "shiny fiddle made of gold" if he outplays the Devil in a one-on-one contest. I draw the following conclusion from this fact:

    The Devil is rather dense to offer such a prize - he/she/it may as well have offered him money, gold or silver that would have made him rich beyond the Dreams of Avarice, because to offer him a fiddle made of gold is just dumb, IF the fiddle player wanted a prize that would match the perfect sounds offered by a genuine, well aged Stratavarius. (See Disorder in the Court for references) Besides, even if a "fiddle made of gold" could be played on with the musical equivalence of a Stratavarius, how long could someone DO that before the derned thing got too heavy to hold up? (not more than a few moments, I wager)
    I suppose though that a lump of gold fashioned into the shape of a fiddle would be worth a VERY pretty penny, and perhaps that it would represent the Dreams of Avarice I mentioned earlier.

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #47 on: November 03, 2006, 04:01:25 PM »
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  • And while we're on the subject of Mr. Daniels, here are some choice lyrics from "Uneasy Rider":

    I was takin a trip out to L.A.
    Toolin along in my cheverolet
    Tokin on a number and diggin on the radio

    Just as I crossed the Mississippi line
    I heard that highway start to whine
    And I knew that left rear tire was about to blow

    Well the spare was flat and I got uptight
    Cause there wasn't a filling station in sight
    So I just limped on down the shoulder on the rim

    I went as far as I could and when I stopped the car
    It was right in front of this little bar
    Kind of a red-neck lookin joint called the Dew Drop Inn

    I stuffed my hair up under my hat
    And told the bartender that I had a flat
    And ywould he be kind enough to give me change for a one

    There was one thing I was sure proud to see
    There wasn't a soul in the place except for him and me
    He just looked disgusted and pointed toward the telephone

    ...

    I just ordered up a beer and sat down at the bar
    When some guy walked in and said, "Who owns this car
    With the peace sign, the mag wheels and the four on the floor?"

    He looked at me and I damn near died
    And I decided that I'd just wait outside
    So I laid a dollar on the bar and headed for the door

    Just when I thought I'd get outta there with my skin
    These 5 big dudes come strollin in
    With one old drunk chick and some fella with green teeth

    I was almost to the door when the biggest one
    Said, "You tip your hat to this lady, son!"
    And when I did, all that hair fell out from underneath

    Now the last thing I wanted was to get into a fight
    In Jackson Mississippi on a Saturday night
    Especially when there was three of them and only one of me


    First of all, if he realized his left rear tire was going bad as he crossed the Mississippi line, and he stopped in Jackson, that's a hell of long ride on a bad tire.

    Secondly, he says at the point where I stopped, "There was three of them and only one of me".  Let's count:  Setting aside Mr. Daniels, there's the bartender, the guy who walks in asking about the car, the five big dudes, the drunk chick, and "Green Teeth".  If my mathematics are not in error, that's nine, not three.  ???
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    Re: Music
    « Reply #48 on: November 03, 2006, 05:30:23 PM »
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  • And while we're nitpicking, the right hand of a keyboard player generally plays the treble or higher notes while the left hand plays the bass or lower notes. To play keyboard in the manner you describe would mean having to cross your arms in front of you.

    This piano player may have been playing with both hands to the right, or treble, side of Middle C. He wasn't playing in a treble clef, though. You can write score music in the treble clef, but since a clef is written music, you don't "play" it in there.   

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    Re: Music
    « Reply #49 on: November 03, 2006, 09:33:09 PM »
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  • And while we're nitpicking, the right hand of a keyboard player generally plays the treble or higher notes while the left hand plays the bass or lower notes. To play keyboard in the manner you describe would mean having to cross your arms in front of you.

    This piano player may have been playing with both hands to the right, or treble, side of Middle C. He wasn't playing in a treble clef, though. You can write score music in the treble clef, but since a clef is written music, you don't "play" it in there.   

    Sorry - I was going by my faultedly bad memory of a piano keyboard - I stand corrected.

    Genius - All too true, but I love that tune and hadn't gotten up the heart to pick it as you - I offer an unqualified bravo.
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