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Offline Giff me dat fill-em!

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Movies
« on: December 15, 2005, 01:14:52 PM »
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  • Star Wars - Revenge of The Sith

    The 6th movie, Return of the Jedi, contains a scene where Luke asks Leia if she remembers her real mother. Leia responds that she only remembers a little, that she was kind, but kind of sad. Luke explains he has no memory of his mother.

    Revenge of the Sith shows the birth of Luke and Leia, and when Luke is born, Padme names him and he is whisked away. Then Leia is born, Padme names her and she is whisked away. Moments later, Padme dies. HOW can Leia have any memory of her mother? I have heard of instances of people remembering things as far back as a few months old, but not at the time of birth.
    « Last Edit: December 15, 2005, 02:53:10 PM by Giff me dat fill-em! »
    The tacks won't come out! Well, they went in ... maybe they're income tacks.

    Offline Giff me dat fill-em!

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #1 on: December 15, 2005, 08:15:44 PM »
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  • The Mask - starring Jim Carrey and Cameron Diaz
    In the "nightclub" scene where Stanley Ipkiss (in the character of "The Mask") moves up to the nightclub orchestra and announces, "Let's ROCK this joint!" ... the song that The Mask's "transformed" band plays is Hey Pachuco (performed by the Royal Crown Revue) which has a DEFINITE jazz/latin flavor to it. I would NOT call it "rock".
    (I know ... "The Mask" was probably refering to picking up the tempo of the atmosphere, but I couldn't resist anyway)
    « Last Edit: December 15, 2005, 09:59:52 PM by Giff me dat fill-em! »
    The tacks won't come out! Well, they went in ... maybe they're income tacks.

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #2 on: December 21, 2005, 01:27:26 AM »
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  • Old movie:  The Wizard of Oz (1939); in that movie, the scene in the witch's castle where the lion, scarecrow, tin man and Toto are trying to rescue Dorothy.  After rescuing her, they are surrounded by the witch's guards.

    Here's the scene:  Scarecrow uses the tin man's axe to cut the rope supporting the chandelier, which has burning candles on it.

    Now here's the blooper:  just before Scarecrow cuts the rope, the candles in the chandelier are burning.  After the rope is cut, when the chandelier falls, the candles are not burning.  In the next scene, after the chandelier has landed on some of the guards, the candles are burning again!  Trick candles?  I thought those were only used on birthday cakes!!


    Nojaa.


    Offline Dunrobin

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #3 on: December 21, 2005, 06:56:09 AM »
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  • Star Wars - Revenge of The Sith

    The 6th movie, Return of the Jedi, contains a scene where Luke asks Leia if she remembers her real mother. Leia responds that she only remembers a little, that she was kind, but kind of sad. Luke explains he has no memory of his mother.

    Revenge of the Sith shows the birth of Luke and Leia, and when Luke is born, Padme names him and he is whisked away. Then Leia is born, Padme names her and she is whisked away. Moments later, Padme dies. HOW can Leia have any memory of her mother? I have heard of instances of people remembering things as far back as a few months old, but not at the time of birth.

    I can think of a plausible explanation:  what Leia remembered as her "mother" was actually the "wet nurse" who took care of her initially.  (Which could also explain why Leia remembered her a kind of sad - the nurse may have been grief striken over Padme's death.)

    Offline Giff me dat fill-em!

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #4 on: December 21, 2005, 08:48:13 AM »
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  • But that still isn't her "real" mother, as Luke had asked of her. I can understand her remembering "Mrs." Organa ... there isn't much said or seen of her in any of the movies. Perhaps she spoke of her in that sense because that was the only mother she knew of, and no one bothered to tell her that she was the daughter of Padme. BUT - if no one told her, then WHY was she a referred to as a princess? The daughter of Queen Amidala (even if she was only a senator at Leia's birth) I would understand as being a princess, but how could Leia be called one if she didn't know anything about her heritage?

    By the way, I think the Star Wars story would have been immensely better if Senator Organa had turned out to be the evil Darth Sidious, instead of the obvious choice of senator Palpatine.
    « Last Edit: December 21, 2005, 09:17:46 AM by Giff me dat fill-em! »
    The tacks won't come out! Well, they went in ... maybe they're income tacks.

    Offline Giff me dat fill-em!

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #5 on: January 21, 2006, 12:53:50 AM »
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  • Star Trek - Any Original Cast Incarnation

    This nitpick is REALLY not one - its just that I've always wanted to translate Spock's "Live Long and Prosper" into a more plausible 21st century wording, that is:

    Get Old and Rich
    The tacks won't come out! Well, they went in ... maybe they're income tacks.

    Offline FineBari3

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #6 on: January 24, 2006, 08:28:32 PM »
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  • I just didnt get the most recent Star Wars trilogy...The real first 3.

    Seeing Star Wars for the first time in 1977, when I was 7,  was one of the most incredible moments of my life. It opened my eyes to the art of filmmaking and movies, and I submerged myself in all things Star Wars. I liked the other two just as much, but hated the Ewoks).

    My ex-brother-in-law is about 8 years younger than I, and he and his dorky friends are OBSESSED with the newer Star Wars stuff.

    I dont get it. Do Star Wars purists like the newer films at all?
    Mar-Jean Zamperini
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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #7 on: January 24, 2006, 09:15:16 PM »
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  • I lost interest after the third "Star Wars," with that idiotic ending, everyone boogieing to horrible disco music in that Ewok treehouse. The first two films were great, but the third one—

    Okay, here's an incident that's still funny to me, years later: I was standing in line outside the Loews 86th Street Theater in N.Y.C., and I got into a conversation with a young black mom from Harlem who had two kids with her, two boys about seven and nine.

    Mom: You like these things a lot?

    Pils: Well, I'm not what you'd call a huge fan, but I do like them because they're really good entertainment... it's not deep stuff, but George Lucas really gives you your money's worth on the screen.

    Mom: I sure don't like 'em! Every time one comes out, these boys want ever' damn Star Wars toy in the toy store! I got enough trouble keeping 'em fed! I sure ain't made of money, but they think I is!

    ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    So, I guess it all depends on your perspective. That was the last Star Wars film I saw, and I haven't seen any of the others. Don't care to, either.

    Hollywood went completely downhill after Shemp died, or maybe after Peter Sellers died... what have we got now? Gay cowboys, yet—




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    Offline FineBari3

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #8 on: January 25, 2006, 08:59:44 AM »
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  • Hollywood went completely downhill after Shemp died, or maybe after Peter Sellers died... what have we got now? Gay cowboys, yet—


    Man, Pils....You mentioned two actors I worship!!!!!  (You do know Peter Sellers was a big band drummer, and a very good one at that!)

    In case you did not get to see the movie "The Life and Death of Peter Sellers", it is on DVD now and even was at my local supermarket. This was released in England as a feature film and was on HBO here last year. What a truly troubled man he was.

    Sellers is a GOD in England! The Brits sure love their eccentric (and certifiably nuts personalities there. (Keith Moon, Oliver Reed, Ken Russell, The Goons). Why is that?

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #9 on: January 25, 2006, 12:14:19 PM »
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  •  I'd have to say that people like The Goons and Peter Sellers are actually something of an acquired taste in Britain. To be honest a fan of the Marx Brothers and the Three Stooges like me is also a rarity over here. Most older folk like Monty Python, Fawlty owers, One Foot In The Grave, and students like The Office, Extras, Nighty Night and that God-awful show Little Britain.
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    Offline FineBari3

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #10 on: January 25, 2006, 01:56:39 PM »
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  • I'd have to say that people like The Goons and Peter Sellers are actually something of an acquired taste in Britain. To be honest a fan of the Marx Brothers and the Three Stooges like me is also a rarity over here. Most older folk like Monty Python, Fawlty owers, One Foot In The Grave, and students like The Office, Extras, Nighty Night and that God-awful show Little Britain.

    Wow...I am surprised to hear that, because I have a few British friends, and I kind of picked it up from them (plus in books about how The Beatles and The Who and other British groups then idolized them). These guys are in the 40-55 age group, as I was wondering if its an age thing.
    Mar-Jean Zamperini
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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #11 on: January 25, 2006, 07:09:47 PM »
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  • I'd have to say that people like The Goons and Peter Sellers are actually something of an acquired taste in Britain. To be honest a fan of the Marx Brothers and the Three Stooges like me is also a rarity over here. Most older folk like Monty Python, Fawlty owers, One Foot In The Grave, and students like The Office, Extras, Nighty Night and that God-awful show Little Britain.

    Wow...I am surprised to hear that, because I have a few British friends, and I kind of picked it up from them (plus in books about how The Beatles and The Who and other British groups then idolized them). These guys are in the 40-55 age group, as I was wondering if its an age thing.

    When I was a kid in N.Y.C. in the 70's, WBAI radio used to play the Goon Show on Wednesday nights. I found it accidentally, just tuning around the dial to find something to listen to. At first I didn't understand what was going on due to the crazy voices and the British accents, but there was something about it that made me keep listening— and it wasn't long before I became a fan. Between the Stooges, the Goons, Jean Shepherd, and a few other maniacs, it's no wonder I developed such a twisted sense of humor!

    Below, left to right: Sir Spike Milligan, Sir Harry Secombe, and Peter Sellers (sadly, all three are gone now).

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    Offline Bruckman

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #12 on: January 27, 2006, 03:36:09 PM »
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  • When I lived in Canada CBC Radio would sometimes play something from the Goon Show. The CBC had a program which ran midafternoons (for the life of me I can't recall the show's name) featuring oddball comedy/musical bits. I still have a tape of Groucho Marx singing excerpts from Gilbert and Sullivan which I recorded off the program.

    Monty Python has the same kind of geek cult status in Canada that, say, Star Trek has here: your intelligence is often measured by how well you can unreel lengthy Python quotations. (I still can do most of the "Can you tell me who lives in that castle" scene from "Holy Grail"). Since Canada is part of the British Commonwealth, British programming is common there. When I was last up there about 7 weeks ago I stayed for several days at a friend's acreage and had to sit through "Coronation Street" every day. Somehow he'd become addicted to this show (for those who've never seen it it's a soap opera with comic undertones, one of the UK's longest-running shows, now into its 4th decade I think).

    Every New Years, the PBS station I pick up from Spokane when the weather's clear runs a Fawlty Towers marathon. Not tough since there are only, what, 14 episodes?

    My mother greatly enjoys "Are You Being Served" and the tart "Waiting For God". She got me hooked on "Keeping Up Appearances" some years ago. I usually catch it on Sat. nights if am not out.


    Re Star Wars: I saw the first 3 as they appeared in theatres, though my brother was the one who really wanted to see them. I was pretty skeptical. By the time THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK was released I was cinematically sophisticated enough to enjoy its stylization of old 30s-40s movie serials, particularly the optical wipes used in scene transitions (common in the 30s, rarely employed nowadays). Seeing those massive walker things from the opening scene on a towering screen was great.

    I've seen the later installments but was distinctly unimpressed. Maybe if I'd seen them in theatres I'd like them better, but I couldn't brave long lines of geekily dressed fanatics and people who sit and talk about every referent in every scene. I like to choose the company I keep. One of the big gaps between my ex and I was her insistence on seeing every Star Trek film that came out in company with fan club members who donned Spock ears, Enterprise jerseys, fake phasers, etc. She'd begm telling me ho wmuch fun it was, and I'd do an Edgar Kennedy slow burn before banging out of the house and heading for the gym to work off my irritation. I'd say I despise Star Trek but despise doesn't convey the full depth of my loathing. I used to tell my ex she'd love me a lot more if I was short, completely bald, and spoke with a ripe Scottish accent a la Patrick Stewart, whom I've considered suing for alienation of affections...............


     
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    Offline Giff me dat fill-em!

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #13 on: September 12, 2006, 02:27:46 AM »
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  • The Ultimate Nitpick ... BEN - HUR (1959 - Charlton Heston)
    specifically, the Great Chariot Race

    1. The chariots make the Grand Procession around the track, and as they complete it (making a turn from a "high over the statue view" which I will call the last turn), the sand before the chariots is devoid of previous hoof prints which should be present if they are finishing their Grand Procession.

    2. Of course, on the very first lap, even before the first turn, the sand appears well-trodden.

    3. The "golden dolphins" that represent the laps completed (seen high in the air in certain deliberate shots) are nine in all, meaning that the race will be finished after nine laps. The same shot of the first turn is offered three times, and a shot of the last turn is offered once, yet the next shot of the golden dolphins indicates that we have only completed the second lap ... what happened to the other lap?

    4. By following the turns and their progressions, and by believing the positions of the previously seen golden dolphins, we can surmise that it is in lap 5 that Masala drives Judah into the wall and he is almost thrown from his chariot when he races over the earlier crashed chariot. This is inconsistent with the next shot of the golden dolphins, which show the sixth one being turned tail up, meaning that we are now entering lap 7, not 6.

    5. The next sequence omits the first turns and only shows them rounding the second, indicating they are finishing the 7th lap - this repeats and we are now ending the 8th lap. Miraculously, the golden dolphins are correct this time, the 8th one is tipped tail up.
    The tacks won't come out! Well, they went in ... maybe they're income tacks.

    Offline Giff me dat fill-em!

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #14 on: October 26, 2006, 01:51:24 AM »
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  • Another note about the Great Chariot Race of "Ben-Hur" ...
    Judah Ben-Hur dons a blue robe and a leather helmet in the staging area just before beginning the Grand Procession around the track. He wears these during the procession, then when he arrives at the starting line, he doffs BOTH the robe and the helmet, while everyone else in the race doffs the robe but keeps their helmets on. (metal ones, by the way) -
    WHY? Is Judah expecting to win by less wind resistance due to a smaller head profile to the wind? Or does he think his head is thick enough without the protection that leather affords?
    The tacks won't come out! Well, they went in ... maybe they're income tacks.

    Offline jrvass

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    Re: Movies
    « Reply #15 on: June 18, 2007, 08:01:21 PM »
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  • When I lived in Canada CBC Radio would sometimes play something from the Goon Show.

    (snip)

    I found the Goon Show on MP3 CD's... and remembered reading about it somewhere (here!).

    http://www.otrcat.com/goonshow.htm

    You get a shitload of shows on a CD and they are only $5/ea. They have other old time radio shows for sale too. Same deal, same price.

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