Soitenly
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Gents In A Jam (1952)  (Read 1677 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline metaldams

  • Global Moderator
  • Egghead
  • ******
  • Posts: 6,048
  • Gender: Male
  • Sugar Daddy in waiting
    • View Profile
Gents In A Jam (1952)
« on: January 08, 2016, 09:09:38 PM »
  • Publish
  • http://www.threestooges.net/filmography/episode/140
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0044655/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

    http://www.veoh.com/m/watch.php?v=v6310195EJMZem7Y

    Watch GENTS IN A JAM in the link above

          This week, we discuss the last short the McCollum/Bernds unit would ever make with The Three Stooges.  I always liked the fact that once things got settled, there were two production units working on shorts, it always lent different feels, whether the director was Charley Chase, Del Lord, or Ed Bernds.  After this, it's 100% Jules White.  We say the stock footage was because of budgetary limitations, and I'm sure that's true, but the idea of Jules White now needing to carry twice the workload I'm sure must have played some part as well.  As far as Edward Bernds, he had a pretty nice career after this.  I can't recommend enough you Stooge fans check out The Bowery Boys films he did after this, some which use Stooge routines.  I maintain those one hour b features are what the Stooges should have moved onto after this, not stock footage Hell.  Ed Bernds will enter the discussion again, but that's not until we get to the Detita features about a year from now.

          As far as GENTS IN A JAM, there is absolutely nothing, zero, zippo, to criticize on this one.  OK, as a silent comedy nerd, I'm saddened to see Snub Pollard, once Harold Lloyd's sidekick and a guy who made some funny Hal Roach silents on his own, now being reduced to being knocked out as a telegram boy and nothing else.  Anything for a paycheck.  There's my incredibly minor nitpick, something I'm sure most of you could care less about.

          Tons of slapstick in this one!  Some of those paintbrush shots Moe gives Larry at the beginning are quite funny, Larry covered in white paint, grimacing, hair all sloppy.  He's sorry for what he's done, but Moe must give out paintbrush comeuppance anyway, because Moe's a freak like that!  Word.  Shemp's salty back talk to the sink faucet is quite funny, and the radio gag has always been a favorite of mine!  Love the energy the short has when the music plays, and the poor radio meeting its watery, asphyxiated demise is something I always remember about this short.  Also want to know how to tame a woman?  Just listen to Moe, pure ladies man, in another classic scene.

          Really, minus my silent comedy dork heart yearning for more Snub Pollard, the entire cast in this one is used brilliantly.  The Rocky Duggan character who tears telephone books in half is great.  Notice the shot where he and all Three Stooges are all together.  They do a low camera angle, like CITIZEN KANE, to accent the much taller appearance of Duggan compared to the boys.  Kitty McHugh is wonderful here and Emil Sitka takes one hell of a beating! 

          An excellent short overall, and a nice swan song for Hugh McCollum.  From this point forward, the shorts are all Jules.  The classics going forward, if I can count them on two hands, and that's a maybe, there won't be many fingers on the second hand.  This week, though, a gem.

    10/10

    Offline Shemp_Diesel

    • Bunionhead
    • ******
    • Posts: 2,237
    • Gender: Male
      • View Profile
    Re: Gents In A Jam (1952)
    « Reply #1 on: January 08, 2016, 11:48:04 PM »
  • Publish
  • Well, this would be the swansong for Ed Bernds at Columbia. And I would say he goes out with a bang, not a whimper. I'm wondering what would have happened if Ed Bernds had not been fired by Columbia--would the stock footage rehashes continued, with Jules White being limited to only remaking his shorts.

    At any rate, Gents is packed with great material. The opening section with the boys trying to spruce up Ms. McGruder's apartment, the great scenes with Moe and Larry, particularly Moe's "cause I got all the brains around here, any objections. Objections overruled." Then, of course, there's Moe's no look shot to Larry with the rolling pin.

    Other great stuff would be Emil Sitka, in what I would call his greatest supporting role. Yes, even better than his role from "Brideless Groom." I just love watching Emil getting bumped and slammed around and his nervous energy throughout that whole scene where the boys are running from Rocky Duggan. Priceless humor.

    And that knee shot that comes cracking at Emil towards the end of this short--I'm giggling as I type. Farewell Ed Bernds--you were one of the all-time greats.

    10 out of 10...
    Now you ask me if I believe a man can become a wolf. Well, if you mean can he take on the physical characteristics of an animal, no, it's fantastic. However, I do believe that most anything can happen to a man in his own mind.

    Offline Dr. Hugo Gansamacher

    • Birdbrain
    • ****
    • Posts: 525
    • Gender: Male
    • "Pleese! You zit!"
      • View Profile
    Re: Gents In A Jam (1952)
    « Reply #2 on: January 09, 2016, 08:33:28 AM »
  • Publish
  • Excellent slapstick in this one. "Hey, imbecile! Move the radio!" "Oh, move the radio!" I now start chuckling as soon as Shemp starts trying to pull the radio off the shelf, and then inevitably laugh out loud when he sets it down and it springs back and crashes through the window.

    I agree with Shemp_Diesel that this is Emil Sitka's finest role in the Stooge shorts. The moment when he steps cautiously into the hall and his knee wobbles with a loud crunching noise is one of my favorites. And Kitty McHugh as Mrs. Battleax is excellent. "You take her!" "You've got her!" "YOU WORM!"

    The bit with the telegram messenger has always seemed a bit weird to me, in the way that we don't see the messenger at all until he has been knocked unconscious. Now I learn from Metaldams that he was a talented comic player. That makes it all the more disappointing that he is given nothing to do until we see him knocked out with the telegram in his hand.

    Offline Big Chief Apumtagribonitz

    • Birdbrain
    • ****
    • Posts: 743
      • View Profile
    Re: Gents In A Jam (1952)
    « Reply #3 on: January 09, 2016, 10:33:57 AM »
  • Publish
  • Emil rules here, all right.

    Offline Lefty

    • Birdbrain
    • ****
    • Posts: 700
      • View Profile
    Re: Gents In A Jam (1952)
    « Reply #4 on: January 09, 2016, 10:53:18 AM »
  • Publish
  • This was a great Shemp short.  The radio and sink gags were pretty good.  And Moe, talking about the biddy-battle-axe when she was right behind him, is worth a rewind to see again.  For a 49-year-old, Kitty McHugh sure looked 79.  Hopefully that was makeup for her (and for Emil Sitka).  And of course, Mrs. Duggan slipping on the cake mixture and Shemp ripping her dress, after which Rocky found out and turned into the villain of the show.  The Eagles could use someone like him on defense.  As for Snub Pollard, instead of him being shown knocked out holding the telegram, someone should have landed on his foot, which would then have been cured, and -- wait a week, that was done already.

    This website lists Kathryn "Kitty" McHugh as not only Mrs. McGruder here and as Mrs. Henderson in "Listen, Judge," but also as Duchess in "Hoi Polloi."  That is quite a turnaround in personality for her.  Yet imdb.com, never known for perfection, lists Katherine "Kitty" McHugh as the then-49-year-old of "Gents in a Jam" and "Listen, Judge," but as a separate individual, Kathryn McHugh, with no date of birth or death, in "Hoi Polloi."

    Offline Paul Pain

    • Moronika's resident meteorologist
    • Moderator
    • Knothead
    • ******
    • Posts: 1,144
    • Gender: Male
    • The heartthrob of millions!
      • View Profile
    Re: Gents In A Jam (1952)
    « Reply #5 on: January 09, 2016, 11:51:04 AM »
  • Publish
  • There isn't much to complain about here.  OK, there's nothing to complain about here.  This short is pretty much what we have come to look for in the ideal Shemp short: verbal and physical abuse.  For once, the jealous husband angle works, and it works BEAUTIFULLY.  Perhaps making it all better is that all the actors are on their A-game, even the one-off Dani Sue Nolan and Mickey Simpson.  Both of our one-hit wonders could have done well with the Stooges, but then again sitting and wishing for them to discover a lost short with Christine McIntyre, Bud Jamison, Kenneth MacDonald, and Vernon Dent all in it hasn't worked yet for me.

    I got to this too late; all you other guys took all the good ideas.  I will point out that, in a rarity, we have a funny chase scene as well.

    The high praise for Emil Sitka is surprising considering how little he actually shows up in this one.  But he was par superior in what little he did have, so it is rather justified.  OK, the praise is well-deserved; he kicked [censored].

    The next few shorts should be interesting as we have shorts varying from "all-time classics" to "only for refined Stoogephiles" to "total crap."

    Quote from: metaldams
    Ed Bernds will enter the discussion again, but that's not until we get to the Detita features about a year from now.

    Yeah, but who's Detita? ;)
    #1 fire kibitzer

    Offline Shemp_Diesel

    • Bunionhead
    • ******
    • Posts: 2,237
    • Gender: Male
      • View Profile
    Re: Gents In A Jam (1952)
    « Reply #6 on: January 09, 2016, 12:26:37 PM »
  • Publish
  • I've always been a Jules White fan, and--if I could--I would say the last 4 or 5 years of stooge shorts with stock footage, the back of Joe Palma's head and Joe Besser shouldn't tarnish all the great output Jules did before that.

    That being said, the classics will be few and far between once we creep into 1953 and 54. Now that I think about it though, there's a handful of great shorts within the 1953 releases--so, maybe it's not all bad. Just my $0.02....

    Now you ask me if I believe a man can become a wolf. Well, if you mean can he take on the physical characteristics of an animal, no, it's fantastic. However, I do believe that most anything can happen to a man in his own mind.

    Offline metaldams

    • Global Moderator
    • Egghead
    • ******
    • Posts: 6,048
    • Gender: Male
    • Sugar Daddy in waiting
      • View Profile
    Re: Gents In A Jam (1952)
    « Reply #7 on: January 09, 2016, 02:42:41 PM »
  • Publish

  • Yeah, but who's Detita? ;)

    A typo, but after seeing him in minimal clothing in THE OUTLAWS IS COMING, perhaps I subliminally meant it.

    Offline Kopfy2013

    • Puddinhead
    • ***
    • Posts: 307
    • Gender: Male
      • View Profile
    Re: Gents In A Jam (1952)
    « Reply #8 on: January 10, 2016, 11:20:57 PM »
  • Publish
  • Did not Emil Sitka share his thoughts  on his last few shorts?   I enjoyed reading his take.

     This short  is above average for me.   Moe steps up bit it almost seems like he's trying to hard.

     I like how he's going to handle the ladies.

    I give it a 6.
    Niagara Falls

    Offline Woe-ee-Woe-Woe80

    • Bonehead
    • **
    • Posts: 113
      • View Profile
    Re: Gents In A Jam (1952)
    « Reply #9 on: November 19, 2017, 03:10:09 AM »
  • Publish
  • Edward Bernds really went out with a grand slam with his final Stooge short he wrote and directed (although he did direct a couple of the 1960's Three Stooges films), this short is hilarious from the beginning to the end and each stooge (especially Moe) gives a great performance, Kitty McHugh and Emil Sitka also give great performances with their roles, I believe this was also Dani Sue Nolan and Mickey Simpson's only appearances with the Stooges and they do a fair job with their roles, I sometimes wonder how the mid 1950's Stooge shorts would fare if producer Hugh McCollum and director/writer Edward Bernds had remained with them, I always thought Hugh McCollum getting fired and Edward Bernds resigning was the true beginning of the end era of the Three Stooges shorts.

    Overall I give this short a classic 10/10