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Author Topic: Brideless Groom (1947)  (Read 5057 times)

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Offline metaldams

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Brideless Groom (1947)
« on: March 27, 2015, 09:53:02 PM »
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  • http://www.threestooges.net/filmography/episode/101
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0039219/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

    http://www.emilsitka.com/bridelessgroom1947.html

    Read Emil Sitka's diary entry about BRIDELESS GROOM in the link above

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TylQyreCIDg

    Watch BRIDELESS GROOM in the link above



          It's BRIDELESS GROOM.  Does the world really need my commentary on this one?  Probably not, but the world's going to get it anyway.  I mean, this short has been praised to Heaven, is available at every Walmart for $1.49, and its footage is in every documentary thanks to its public domain status.  I do agree with all the praise, as I feel this short is a masterpiece.

          My personal story is when I got back into The Three Stooges in my early twenties, I had a five VHS Goodtimes box set to start with, and the tape I watched the most was the one with the four public domain shorts, over, and over, and over again.  Did a wonderful job of making me realize Shemp was better than I remembered as a child.

          The story of this short involves Shemp needing to marry in a ridiculously short amount of time in order to inherit his dead uncle's fortune.   A similar plot can be found in Buster Keaton's SEVEN CHANCES.  For further commentary about this, please see the most recent issue of THE THREE STOOGES JOURNAL.

          Where to start?  The beginning is a good place.  Shemp is giving Dee Green some singing lessons, and Ms. Green's singing is loud and out of key.  Shemp's frazzled out reactions are perfect and a joy to watch.  Again, words fail me, it's one of those physical things that's funny just because.  Dee Green is wonderful here too, and she's making her Stooge debut.  A wonderful scene, and not a bad place to introduce someone to Shemp.

          I also love the phone booth scene.  Watching two comics struggle in close quarters tends to be either real funny or if it goes on too long, tedious.  The former happens in this short, a good example of the latter....you guys will have to actually follow my Laurel and Hardy reviews if you really want to know in the future - ha!   [pie].  Admittedly, as good as the phone booth scene is here, they do even better in SCRAMBLED BRAINS.  My favorite bit here, funnily enough, is Larry biting his fingernails and spitting them on the ground.  It's funny because it's so blatantly throwaway it's impossible not to love.  Give the old porcupine something to do!

          The scene where they are getting Shemp ready to meet Ms. Hopkins is another classic.  Lots of fun little slapstick bits, my favorites being Shemp shaving himself and Shemp thinking his head is cut off.  Guys, does anybody else wince watching Shemp shave himself so roughly.  Not quite getting kicked in the groin level, but getting close!

          Ah yes, Ms. Hopkins, Ms. McIntyre herself.  One of her all time best performances, and maybe her most famous.  Heck, you can buy it for $1.49 at Walmart, so it should be!  But seriously, she's wonderful here.  Completely high strung, a never ending barrage of kisses, dialogue, slaps, and the final punch, which Shemp in real life really had to convince her to do.  Shemp's a trooper, and Christine rules.  By the way, would anybody else be creeped out having a cousin act that affectionately towards you?  I don't care if she looks that gorgeous, that's still family and creepy, but in the context of a Stooge short, pretty damn funny.  Does anybody else find it funny that Shemp is initially confident when he's about to propose to Ms. Hopkins before getting dressed up but kind of cowers after the fact?

          Finally, we have the finale where all the gold diggers get into an epic cat fight trying to get Shemp and his fortune....not necessarily in that order.  The one who sticks Shemp's head in a vice, I used to have a boss who looked just like her.  Monthly evaluations were more fun back then.  Emil Sitka's "Hold hands you lovebirds" is how the man is most remembered, again, the magic of Walmart.  Just pure, unbridled estrogen digging for gold and acting violent (the romantic in me wants to think at least one of them loved Shemp for deeper reasons....nah).  It's fun watching Moe and Larry decide proper etiquette towards a woman by choosing the correct weapon to hit her with, a great example of warped Stooge logic.

          Just a great short overall, and one of Shemp's all-time great performances.  The first Shemp short I shall bestow a perfect score, and I'm just another in a long line of schmucks who sings this short's praises.  For duty and humanity.

    10/10


    "Those are the three elements, I think, that go into being happy: Find something you love, be good at it, and have other people pat you on the back and say "good job." - George Carlin

    Offline Big Chief Apumtagribonitz

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #1 on: March 27, 2015, 10:51:24 PM »
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  • I'm guessing that I don't have to point out to all of you intelligent imbeciles that Shemp's studio/apartment is the same room as the Justice of the Peace's office.  Yes this is a funny short, not one of my absolute faves ( maybe thru simple over exposure ) but certainly a gem, yet the reuse of the main set in so blatant a manner is a dark hint of the cheapness to come.  Meanwhile, Moe crawling around on his hands and knees in the vain hope of hemming Shemp's pants while he's still wearing them is an underplayed stooge moment for the ages.

    Offline Squirrelbait

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #2 on: March 28, 2015, 12:58:21 AM »
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  • Not just one of the greatest SHEMP shorts, but one of the greatest THREE STOOGES shorts of all time. Period.
    Yes, it's in the public domain and we've all seen it 1,000 times, but it's a classic.

    Hold hands you lovebirds!

    10/10
    If there's no other place around the place, I reckon this must be the place, I reckon.

    Offline Paul Pain

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #3 on: March 28, 2015, 04:59:40 AM »
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  • I'm going to go against the grain on this one and say that it's only an 8/10 in my book, but for one and only one reason.  There are so many shorts that I like better than this one, and that's pretty much how it is on this one.

    The opening scene is where Shemp earns his paycheck for the week.  He acts so much like my piano teacher it's not even funny.  And then Larry trying to outdo Dee Green's singing at the piano made everything better.

    While the phone booth scene is done better in SCRAMBLED BRAINS, this one is just plain ROTFLMAOcopter hysterical (which speaks volumes of the latter!).  Between Shemp and Moe's phone booth destruction, and Larry's boorish behavior on the outside, what's not to like?

    Shemp is an excellent destroyer of fine music.  The piano is put through extreme suffering, and it's hard to compare to what he does in GYPPED IN THE PENTHOUSE.  But I can't help but laugh here.

    The scene in the justice's office is where I lose it.  I just don't see anything funny about this scene except for (a) Emil and his reactions, and (b) Larry's dialogue "Use this; it's bigger."  It just... doesn't do it for me.  The whole "golddigger" theme just never does it for me in ANY episode of ANY program except for murder mystery's, and that with limitations.
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    Offline Lefty

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #4 on: March 28, 2015, 10:33:37 AM »
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  • Brideless Groom is not too shabby.  For Shemp to have to put up with Dee Green's singing, that should qualify for hazard pay.  The phone booth scene, with that "unidentified fat woman in hallway" seeing Shemp and slapping Larry, well, to that I say, "Don't be so particular, Roseanne!"  Naturally, none of the gold diggers would look like that.  As for Miss Hopkins all over whom she thought was Cousin Basil, either Basil was her second cousin, or she was from Wanker County, Wisconsin, where "Nothin' says lovin' like marryin' your cousin."

    Offline Shemp_Diesel

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #5 on: March 28, 2015, 05:46:20 PM »
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  • I don't think I have too much to add here--one of the all-time greats & its public domain status does nothing to change how great it is. The opening section with Shemp the music teacher, Cousin Basil and, of course, "Hold Hands, you lovebirds" adds up to one of the greatest.

    And yes, I've always wondered about Christine's rather amorous reaction to her cousin--but as Lefty hinted at, maybe they were very distant cousins...   ;)

    This may be Shemp's greatest performance as a stooge--either this or Scrambled Brains; I have trouble deciding between the two...

    10 out of 10....


    Now you ask me if I believe a man can become a wolf. Well, if you mean can he take on the physical characteristics of an animal, no, it's fantastic. However, I do believe that most anything can happen to a man in his own mind.

    Offline Dr. Hugo Gansamacher

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #6 on: March 29, 2015, 08:38:49 AM »
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  • Oh, what a beautiful messterpiece! (As Shemp would say.)

    I generally don't engage in the business of ranking and rating the shorts, but I don't see how one that contains the scenes of Shemp and Moe in the phone booth, "Hold hands, you love birds," and, above all, "Cousin Basil" can be placed anywhere but among the ones at the top. "Cousin Basil" alone would be enough to make this short one of the irreplaceable classics. In addition to those bits, the scenes of the voice lesson (Christine MacIntyre's recorded voice from Micro Phonies at the very beginning is her first appearance in the short, before she comes back as "Miss Hopkins"), Shemp getting spruced up ("Moe! My head is off! . . . Oh, there I am--and as pretty as a picture!" "Yeah, of an ape!" (slap)) and Shemp getting entangled in the judge's piano ("My piano!" "Shut up!") are all funny and well done.  So this is a consistently funny short in which the action is driven by a single plot device (however lame in itself) and that contains one of the most explosively hilarious scenes in all of Stoogery.

    Special mention for the gag when Larry and Moe are trying to extricate Shemp from the piano and they let go of him and he slams into the instrument in fast motion [edited to add: twice]. Granted, it pales by comparison with his getting slammed right through Jean Willes's piano in Gypped in the Penthouse, but it's still pretty funny in its own right.


    Offline Shemp_Diesel

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #7 on: March 29, 2015, 09:07:14 AM »
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  • The phone booth scene--not quite as great as the immortal phone booth from Scrambled, but still great in its own right. Maybe my favorite bit during all of it is when Larry checks in on Moe & Shemp--how you doing? *double punch*....

    And I also have to add, that this early part of the Shemp era is off to a fantastic start--there was one slight hiccup imo with Out West, but overall, these early Shemp shorts are kicking ass & the roll continues into the next week....


    Now you ask me if I believe a man can become a wolf. Well, if you mean can he take on the physical characteristics of an animal, no, it's fantastic. However, I do believe that most anything can happen to a man in his own mind.

    Offline Shemp_is_Awesome78

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #8 on: March 29, 2015, 09:40:27 AM »
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  •  Ah, I don't even have to give a review for this one. This short does not need any commentary from me, so I'll rate it a perfect score.

     10/10 ( easily)
    Abbottt: Stop smoking in here, Costello!
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    Abbott: You have a cigar in your mouth!
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    Offline GreenCanaries

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #9 on: March 29, 2015, 10:06:15 AM »
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  • Agreed with what everyone else is saying. Many a public domain (and as such, one of the first Stooge shorts I ever watched) viewing hasn't dulled enjoyment of this one a bit.

    - "You're supposed to be singing about the voices of spring! Not the eruption of a volcano!"
    - "Gargle with old razorblades!"
    - The whole Uncle Caleb dialogue with Shemp & Moe. (""*squeal* Poor Uncle Caleb! Like I said, he was a swell guy! He'd give you the short off his back and throw in the buttons too!")
    - "Moe! Where's your hat?"
    - The whole Cousin Basil scene - great and one of Christine McIntyre's premier performances in a Stooge short. (favorite line: "Don't you dare strike me!")
    - Shemp's frazzled "Can I help it that I ain't Cousin Basil?" is the icing on the cake.
    - "Well, your little dreamboat is sailing! A-woo-woo..."
    - "My poor piano!" "Shut up..."
    - And of course... "Hold hands, you lovebirds!"

    Another interesting note: Seven Chances has been mentioned, but it should be noted that Clyde Bruckman did the script for both.

    A classic with many quotable moments overall. 10/10, easily.
    "With oranges, it's much harder..."

    Offline Big Chief Apumtagribonitz

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #10 on: March 29, 2015, 07:46:34 PM »
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  • I'd say that Shemp got off to a brilliant start, and I wouldn't even exempt Out West, which I find lively and fun.  The first four have a very high batting average for a team coming back from a devastating personnel loss, and I really don't mean to develop a baseball metaphor to that degree, but I think the comparison is apt.  Consider Hardy and Langdon in Zenobia for a comparable case, and appreciate the magnificently smooth transition here.  They kicked butt in Fright Night and never looked back.

    Offline metaldams

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #11 on: March 29, 2015, 07:53:01 PM »
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  • I'd say that Shemp got off to a brilliant start, and I wouldn't even exempt Out West, which I find lively and fun.  The first four have a very high batting average for a team coming back from a devastating personnel loss, and I really don't mean to develop a baseball metaphor to that degree, but I think the comparison is apt.  Consider Hardy and Langdon in Zenobia for a comparable case, and appreciate the magnificently smooth transition here.  They kicked butt in Fright Night and never looked back.

    The scripts, in my mind, weren't always perfect, but the characterizations and team chemistry happened right away, there's no doubt.  I can't think of a single Shemp moment in these early films where I think he performs a mannerism or has a relationship with the other two that would be uncharacteristic later on.

    You mention ZENOBIA, thanks for mentioning it.  I know it's a long way off, but I'm considering inserting that one in my Laurel and Hardy reviews when the time comes.  Not decided yet, but I was lucky to DVR it off TCM years ago, and I still have my copy.
    "Those are the three elements, I think, that go into being happy: Find something you love, be good at it, and have other people pat you on the back and say "good job." - George Carlin

    Offline Big Chief Apumtagribonitz

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #12 on: March 29, 2015, 08:27:50 PM »
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  • I've never seen Zenobia except in bits and pieces, but I'm given to understand that it was, originally and in retrospect, a failure.

    Offline metaldams

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #13 on: March 29, 2015, 08:30:53 PM »
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  • I've never seen Zenobia except in bits and pieces, but I'm given to understand that it was, originally and in retrospect, a failure.

    Been a while since I've seen it, but I remember appreciating it for what is is rather than what it isn't.  Who knows what the next viewing will bring, but yeah, definitely a failure at the time.
    "Those are the three elements, I think, that go into being happy: Find something you love, be good at it, and have other people pat you on the back and say "good job." - George Carlin

    Offline Big Chief Apumtagribonitz

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #14 on: March 29, 2015, 08:54:18 PM »
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  • I guess it was just business as usual and the studios were just relentlessly grinding out the product, and this is unquestionably a subject for later rather than now, but I always have cogitated on these back-to-back blunders:  in Zenobia, they try to sell Hardy without Laurel, and in The Flying Deuces, they actually kill off Ollie at the end.  How in the world would they expect to sell these two films?  Never mind to the public, how would they expect to sell them to the exhibitors?  Zenobia is, of course, Roach's fault, but I have the bad feeling that the ending of Deuces was one of Stan's freak endings made worse from the lack of Roach's veto power.  Real discussion to come in 2016, I guess.

    Offline Desmond Of The Outer Sanctorum

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #15 on: March 31, 2015, 07:12:50 AM »
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  • I guess I kind of overthink this one, but... Does anyone else think Shemp is not only better off ending up with Fanny Dinkelmeyer than he would have been with any of the others, but actually knows it at some level? When he's confronted by the group of ladies who'd said no to him before, note how he maintains that he's with Fanny -- specifically in that brief moment before the other ladies really show how mean they are. After all, as annoying as she is in the beginning, she turns out to be kindhearted, and the only one that cares about Shemp rather than the money.

    And this is getting ahead of things, but I can't think of BRIDELESS without also thinking of the remake HUSBANDS BEWARE -- possibly the Shemp remake that does the worst job of using the footage from the original. In the context of HUSBANDS, it makes NO sense for Moe and Larry to be trying to hook Shemp up with Christine's character. And it leaves me feeling like Shemp is really better off with Fanny compared to how Moe and Larry fared with their marriages (thus making their revenge not quite so effective).
    "Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day." -- Samuel Goldwyn

    Many would rather believe a lie because truth demands a response.

    Offline metaldams

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #16 on: March 31, 2015, 08:02:01 AM »
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  • I guess I kind of overthink this one, but... Does anyone else think Shemp is not only better off ending up with Fanny Dinkelmeyer than he would have been with any of the others, but actually knows it at some level? When he's confronted by the group of ladies who'd said no to him before, note how he maintains that he's with Fanny -- specifically in that brief moment before the other ladies really show how mean they are. After all, as annoying as she is in the beginning, she turns out to be kindhearted, and the only one that cares about Shemp rather than the money.


    He's better off in the sense he found someone who doesn't want him just for his money, but does Shemp want her?  I don't think he wanted to marry, period, but money talks.
    "Those are the three elements, I think, that go into being happy: Find something you love, be good at it, and have other people pat you on the back and say "good job." - George Carlin

    Offline Shemp_Diesel

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #17 on: March 31, 2015, 08:18:07 AM »
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  • One small thing I like--when Shemp blinds himself with the shaving brush, he's hollering that he put his eye out, then when Moe asks him where the towels are, Shemp calmly says "in the bottom drawer" then Moe just gives him one of his looks, almost as if he was thinking what's the matter with this nitwit.


    Now you ask me if I believe a man can become a wolf. Well, if you mean can he take on the physical characteristics of an animal, no, it's fantastic. However, I do believe that most anything can happen to a man in his own mind.

    Offline Signor Spumoni

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #18 on: March 31, 2015, 11:13:51 AM »
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  • I'm late to the party here, and most of my favorite parts have already been listed.  I will add that I enjoy watching Emil Sitka's indefatigable justice of the peace very much, and I'm glad he was able to use his most famous phrase for many real-life weddings, if only by phone.  I think that's fun and it must have been nice for ES to have been asked to do that.

    I enjoy the contrast between the way the gold-diggers look and dress - - refined and classy, as true ladies - - and the way they behave - - as violent harpies. 

    It was years before I noticed that there are only five women involved in the scene at the justice's office.  Before that, I had the impression there were dozens, partly because of the background sound effects and partly because of the way it was shot.

    I must be a romantic, at least in part, because I always hoped that Shemp would come to care for Dee Green once he (a) got used to the idea of being married, and (b) got used to her looks.  BTW, how funny that DG loves him in spite of his looks while he can't stand her largely because of her looks. 

    Someone mentioned "Seven Chances."  I have to add that "Seven Chances" has, arguably, the best motion picture chase scene.

    Offline Desmond Of The Outer Sanctorum

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #19 on: March 31, 2015, 12:44:12 PM »
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  • how funny that DG loves him in spite of his looks while he can't stand her largely because of her looks.
    Shemp doesn't specifically say why he doesn't like her, but I guess it's implied that it's a combination of things -- that she's homely, annoying and sings badly.
    "Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day." -- Samuel Goldwyn

    Many would rather believe a lie because truth demands a response.

    Offline Signor Spumoni

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #20 on: March 31, 2015, 03:02:52 PM »
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  • Shemp doesn't specifically say why he doesn't like her, but I guess it's implied that it's a combination of things -- that she's homely, annoying and sings badly.

    You're right that he doesn't specify why.  And you're right that it's implied.  I figured her biggest drawback was her looks.  She wouldn't necessarily have wanted to continue her singing lessons once they married, assuming she went at least partially to see Shemp, and once she "bagged him" as a husband, she would/might become less annoying because she would no longer be overly eager.  But her looks would still be the same.   Thought to give one pause:  their potential children's looks!   :o

    Offline Shemp_Diesel

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #21 on: March 31, 2015, 03:41:11 PM »
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  • All this talk of Dee Green has me looking ahead a bit & thinking of how unfortunate it is that--unless I'm mistaken--she only has 2 more appearances left in the stooge shorts. She was such a good jumping point for some of Shemp's zingers in regards to her looks & overall, I think she was a pretty good actress too. I guess she should go on the list of supporting players we would have liked to see more of....


    Now you ask me if I believe a man can become a wolf. Well, if you mean can he take on the physical characteristics of an animal, no, it's fantastic. However, I do believe that most anything can happen to a man in his own mind.

    Offline Signor Spumoni

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #22 on: March 31, 2015, 08:32:57 PM »
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  • All this talk of Dee Green has me looking ahead a bit & thinking of how unfortunate it is that--unless I'm mistaken--she only has 2 more appearances left in the stooge shorts. She was such a good jumping point for some of Shemp's zingers in regards to her looks & overall, I think she was a pretty good actress too. I guess she should go on the list of supporting players we would have liked to see more of....

    I second that.  I like Dee Green.  In addition to being a good actress and a good inspiration for Shemp, she looks like she would have been fun to know.

    Offline Kopfy2013

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #23 on: April 10, 2015, 11:27:38 PM »
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  •   Help!  Help!  Great ending.  Great brawl at the end.   So far the best Shemp episode.  I give it an 8 as this was still not as good as Curly's hits - 3 Little Pigskins for example.
    Niagara Falls

    Offline Desmond Of The Outer Sanctorum

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    Re: Brideless Groom (1947)
    « Reply #24 on: May 24, 2016, 07:03:16 AM »
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  • Watching this again, I find it interesting to watch the faces and body language of Shemp & Fanny in the Justice of the Peace's office.

    When they first arrive there, Shemp seems to be getting reconciled (or at least resigned) to the whole idea. Most interesting of all, though, is when the other ladies come in, wanting to get him for the $500,000. When the Justice says "She's the bride," Shemp looks at Fanny and jumps as if startled. Yet when he says "But I'm with..." he turns towards her arms like his being with her is the most natural thing in the world. Maybe she suddenly looks better compared to all the mean women... or maybe he's just faking so as to try to get them to leave him alone?

    At the end -- when he runs away yelling "Help! Help!" -- I feel bad for Fanny, as she apparently really starts to see that he doesn't want her, and only wanted the money. I do have to wonder, though... what exactly did she see in him? He's dumb and mean, among other possible things!

    On a different note, I do wonder what she's doing while the mean broad has Shemp's head in a vise. By all rights she should be fighting to get him out of there (although it apparently wouldn't have worked to try to write things that way!).

    (This must be the most "overthinkable" Stooge short of all...)
    "Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day." -- Samuel Goldwyn

    Many would rather believe a lie because truth demands a response.