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Author Topic: Goofs and Saddles (1937)  (Read 4084 times)

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Offline metaldams

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Goofs and Saddles (1937)
« on: October 04, 2013, 09:16:28 PM »
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  • http://www.threestooges.net/filmography/episode/24
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0028947/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

    Some shorts lend themselves to analysis better than others, like say....the short we'll be discussing next week.  GOOFS AND SADDLES is just one of those shorts that just is there.  It's The Three Stooges, it's funny, and they're in their prime.  Nothing wrong with that.

    The beginning kind of reminds me of UNCIVIL WARRIORS with the boys falling out of the tree, and one thing I guess is worth noting is that also like UNCIVIL WARRIORS, GOOFS AND SADDLES spoofs U.S. soldiers, in this case post Civil War Calvary men, something you'd NEVER see once WWII starts.

    The bush scene has always been a favorite of mine since childhood, and though he has about one line, Cy Schindell is funny simply because he's a cowboy with a Brooklyn accent.  I also enjoy the look of satisfaction on Larry's face when he gets the two cattle rustler's heads stuck in the window and bonks them on the head.  It's true what they say about Larry, the more you watch these things, the more you appreciate him because of the subtle things.

    7/10
    « Last Edit: November 29, 2014, 10:00:35 PM by metaldams »

    Offline Shemp_Diesel

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #1 on: October 05, 2013, 11:57:10 AM »
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  • Goofs and Saddles has always been one of my favorite stooge westerns, if not the favorite. I've always wondered what the short would have been like if Moe, Larry and Curly had worn those nutty wigs & mustaches through the whole short.

    Stanley Blystone has always been one of my favorite supporting players & I love his turn as Longhorn Pete, especially that bit during the poker game where you see in the background 3 bodies being carried out & Pete explains "those are three crooks I shot for cheating at a card game." And the stooges reaction is priceless.

    Also enjoyed the whole routine of "Buffalo Billious, Wild Bill Hiccop, Just Plain Bill."

    I rate this short a solid 8 out of 10...
    Now you ask me if I believe a man can become a wolf. Well, if you mean can he take on the physical characteristics of an animal, no, it's fantastic. However, I do believe that most anything can happen to a man in his own mind.

    Offline shemps#1

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #2 on: October 05, 2013, 02:48:19 PM »
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  • Goofs and Saddles definitely picks up the pace from the previous short and may very well be not only my favorite short from 1937 but one of my favorite Curly shorts of all time. I loved just about everything about this one, from the beginning to the wild card game to the end with the Capuchin firing off a few rounds with the meat grinder. All in all a highly recommended short, 4.5 out 5 pokes.
    « Last Edit: December 23, 2014, 06:47:22 PM by metaldams »
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    Offline JazzBill

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #3 on: October 11, 2013, 09:05:48 PM »
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  • After watching this short I just realized I like this short a lot. First off, when Moe and Curly are in their get up I notice that they actually do look like brothers. Usually they don't look anything alike. There are plenty of sight gags and funny bits. I like the boys in the bushes gag and the card game bit. Some of my favorite 2ND tier costars are in this one. Ted Lorch, Stanely Blystone, Eddie Laughton and Ethelreda Leopold make a pretty good cast. I like this short a lot and rate it a 9. 
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    Offline Lefty

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #4 on: October 13, 2013, 09:55:02 AM »
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  • Having been a wee bit busy last weekend, I did not comment on this particular short.  This, along with "A Gem of a Jam" and "You Nazty Spy" were never broadcast locally until June of 1984, the time that the channel showing them changed their editing mode from lopping off the first few minutes of the third short each day to ripping out pieces here and there. 

    "Goofs and Saddles" might just be the Stooges' "Best Western" (cheap plug).  And while typing this I got 4 kinks in my back.  My favorite part of the short was the battle with Longhorn Pete and his motley crew.

    Offline Kopfy2013

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #5 on: October 15, 2013, 09:42:50 PM »
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  • Looks like I'm in a minority again. I thought the short was okay. Not great. I thought the last short was good others did not. Others think this is good I do not.

    To meet it is a little slow. However still enjoyable to watch.

    The bush scene goes on to long.  The rustlers continuing to shoot at the door at the end was a little silly to me, just knock the door down.

    However there are a few notable items:
    -- Just plain Bill
    -- Curly shuffling the cards
    -- Four kinks in my back
    -- Passing the aces with their feet.

    Agree with metal about Larry's satisfaction with clobbering the rustlers.  It is the subtle things that makes him great.
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    Offline stoogerascalfan62

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #6 on: January 17, 2014, 09:45:32 AM »
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  • Along with his role in Back From The Front, Longhorn Pete was Stanley Blystone's best role.

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #7 on: January 22, 2014, 11:52:59 AM »
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  • "I always go to the desert...Oasis, oasis!" "That's nothin' I've been to the oasis twice!" "Me too!" Then Stanley Blystone, "Never mind the tours!"

    The card-playing scene makes up for whatever else is average in this short. The way Curly shuffles the cards (but doesn't let Stanley cut them; "Don't trust me, ay?"); The angry "la-leeeee-la la" lyric Curly sings when the first card exchange with Moe isn't successful; the way Curly reacts when Bill the Pigeon flies onto Blystone's shoulder.... 

    Another favorite part of mine is the somersault the cattle rustler executes when his axe is held by Curly. In general I give this short a 7, but card scene I give a 9!

    Offline Paul Pain

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #8 on: August 24, 2014, 04:08:23 AM »
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  • Although the plot is slow, I have always strongly enjoyed this one.  Lots of old jokes are beaten to death, but they are used in a fresh manner that makes them funny.
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    Offline Larrys#1

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #9 on: February 09, 2015, 05:23:15 PM »
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  • Anyone notice the lack of face slapping in this one?? I think there was one face slap from Moe to Larry and a kick on the shins from Moe to Curly. That's it. Interesting, ain't it?

    I'm not crazy about western films in particular, whether it be comedy, action or drama, but this episode isn't too bad. A few funny scenes here.... The stooges hiding in the bushes, cheating at the card games and using the meat grinder as a machine gun.

    I have to mention.... that was some faint from Curly when he looked at the tall guy. I don't know how he can just fall like that in real life and fully entrust in Moe to catch him. I'd never be able to do that in a million years.

    8.5/10

    Offline Dr. Hugo Gansamacher

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #10 on: April 23, 2015, 08:36:47 AM »
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  • General Muster: And remember--
    Stooges: (in unison) Yes?
    General Muster: The entire West depends on you!
    Stooges: (in unison) No!
    General Muster: Yes!

    For some reason I always relish this bit, both in this short and in its original (or previous, anyway) occurrence in Dizzy Doctors. It is reused just before the end of the short, but I can't transcribe the second exchange because I can't make out the first part of Ted Lorch's first line (it sounds to me like "Tobela"--"Tobela work, my men!").

    I note the use of a gag that will be heavily worked in Get Smart thirty years later: Buffalo Billious (Curly) is sniffing along the ground as Wild Bill Hiccup (Moe) and Just Plain Bill (Larry) follow. Suddenly he starts barking excitedly. "What is it, Buff, what is it?" says Wild Bill. "You're on my hand!" he replies. (In Get Smart the words will come from a fatally wounded man who whispers something to Agent 86, who is bent over him, before dying. "What did he say, Max?" "He asked me to get my knee off his chest.")

    Notable appearance by Cy Shindell as a cattle rustler: "I just got woid trou da grapevine. . . ."

    Offline stoogerascalfan62

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #11 on: August 10, 2015, 01:47:54 PM »
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  • One part I didn't like was Moe accusing Larry of knocking him off his horse and then slapping him. If I were Larry I'd have gotten back at Moe.

    Offline Paul Pain

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #12 on: April 03, 2016, 11:36:17 AM »
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  • Recent viewings are always a good thing.  I love the little ditty Curly sings while passing the cards under the table.  Stooges falling from a tree is always good, especially when dummies are obvious!  Curly getting his @$$ eaten by an @$$ is subtle, foul humor that slips by the censor.  All in all, I still enjoy this short quite a bit, although everyone knows that chimpanzees are always evil and will burn in hell.
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    Offline Woe-ee-Woe-Woe80

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    Re: Goofs and Saddles (1937)
    « Reply #13 on: November 19, 2017, 02:56:14 AM »
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  • Good Stooge western but Moe hardly dishes out any punishment, the only punishment Moe dishes out is kicking Curly in the shins at the card game scene and slaps Larry after accusing him of throwing him off of the horse, I wish Moe had dished out more punishment, I do love the song Curly is humming at the card game scene, other good scenes is when Larry grabs a man's hat and throws it so he can flirt with his girl, Larry knocking out the bad guys after their heads got stuck in the window, Curly in the loose wagon and Moe & Curly cheating in the card game.

    Overall I give this short a 7.5 out of 10