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Author Topic: Slippery Silks (1936)  (Read 5109 times)

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Offline metaldams

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Slippery Silks (1936)
« on: August 31, 2013, 09:35:18 AM »
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  • http://www.threestooges.net/filmography/episode/19
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0028267/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

    As far as the discussion goes, a minor landmark as we are now at the ten percent mark and as far as the DVD's, finished with volume 1.

    SLIPPERY SILKS is one of the all time great Stooge shorts, with shorts like this being the reason I'm a fan.  There is literally not one criticism I have of this one.  We've got all the elements I like: the Stooges working well together in their prime meshing with high society and tools, a climatic pastry fight, and a great supporting cast.

    The boys themselves are fun to watch in this one and have a few wonderful bits where all three work together as a team.  The "hi-lee, hi lo" bit is a wonderful example.  I also like Moe's reaction to Curly's "sort of aged in the wood" remark where he puts his fist above Larry's head, says, "See that?," has Curly smack Moe's fist causing a windmill motion of Moe's arm to smack Larry's head.  Curly's pun begats Moe's fist which begats Larry's bonked head.  Stooge harmony at it's finest, it brings a tear to my eye.

    Of course the supporting cast is great.  This is the second Stooge appearances of both Vernon Dent and Symona Boniface, but their first classic roles in my opinion.  Vernon had a pleasant enough scene in HALF-SHOT SHOOTERS but his role was minor and Symona in PARDON MY SCOTCH had a non-speaking role as an extra, so it's great to see them both have prominent roles in this one, as they are both amongst the great supporting players.  Vernon getting angry over the "50,000 dollar" woodwork is prime Vernon and the sped up fist fight is a riot.  Symona Boniface is wonderful as the high socitey woman the boys play off of.  It's great how she plays it straight loving those wacky furniture designed dresses the boys designed, and I love it when she's getting a dress made for her on that spinny thing a ma jig.  Definitely to The Three Stooges what Margaret Dumont was to the Marx Brothers.  Finally, we get to say goodbye to Hilda Title, and let's not mince words, she is friggin' smoking God dayum mouth watering hot in that French maid outfit.  Her final shot in a Stooge short is a perfect way to go.

    Speaking of backsides, though of a different variety, earlier in the short Curly gets roofing nails stuck to his rear, and the boys both pry them out.  Prying objects out of third Stooge's backsides is a staple over the years, and since I couldn't find a mention in the Stooge routines and don't remember this being done in an earlier short, I want to say this is the first time.  Somebody please correct me if I'm wrong.

    Overall, a perfect short. 

    10/10
    « Last Edit: November 29, 2014, 10:14:36 PM by metaldams »

    Offline Lefty

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #1 on: August 31, 2013, 10:24:29 AM »
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  • This is the final episode of Volume 1, and one of my favorites from any DVD set.

    The scenes with Vernon Dent were very funny, as was the brawl-for-all with whatever they were throwing around.

    A long time ago, when the Stooges were on a local UHF channel, said channel cut out many scenes of many shorts to get their 17 minutes of commercials in a one-hour, three-episode time slot.  Two of the great quote scenes were part of the cuts:  "Hi Lee, Hi Lo," and my favorite:

    Vernon Dent:  "Are you sure this cabinet will be in competent hands?"
    Curly:  "Soitenly!  We're all incompetent!"

    Offline Dr. Hugo Gansamacher

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #2 on: August 31, 2013, 04:49:10 PM »
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  • This short has two great sequences: the business with the Chinese cabinet at the beginning and the cream-puff fight at the end. But the long stretch in between the two seems to me mostly pretty dull.

    It's a delight to see Vernon Dent, the Stooges' irascible, cubical nemesis, in his first full-sized role, as Mr. Morgan Morgan. But it is regrettable as well as inexplicable that he disappears from the action after punching Curly and Larry. Perhaps he just took Mrs. Morgan and went home. [Correction: That can't be right, because Mrs. Morgan is there for the cream-puff fight that follows.] On the one hand, one would have liked to see him continue through to the end of the short. On the other, it's hard to improve on the ending that the short has, in which the tallest and haughtiest of the three ladies who have been outraged to be hit by cream puffs gravely summons the Stooges from their hiding place ("Boys! Boys!") and then the three give the boys all together a concerted conk on the head with pieces of modeling dummies.

    "Hi Lee, Hi Lo": Moe, after showing what initially seems like a sympathetic understanding of what Curly and Larry are doing ("Hi Lee, Hi Lo? . . .  Boop-boop?"), gives them both a slap, not for doing anything wrong but just for trying to be funny—unless trying to be funny, when done by a subordinate Stooge, counts as doing something wrong in Moe's book.

    My favorite part of the Stooges' attempt to "repair" the Chinese cabinet is Moe's crushing one half of it under his foot in an attempt to unstick it from his hand. That detail always makes me laugh.

    I will add to my catalogue of acts of aggression by subordinate Stooges against Moe Curly's use of a spring-loaded dummy hand to give Moe a prosthetic slap in the face.

    There is also a very satisfying moment of non-violent conspiracy between Larry and Curly against Moe in retaliation for his having brained them with telephone receivers: they tell him to put his right hand on his right hip, turn his head to his left and throw it back, then together make a fey gesture and go "Woo!" in mockery of the frou-frou pose that they have put him into.

    The cream-puff fight repeats several actions from the clay fight in Wee Wee Monsieur, but has some new touches: Moe getting hit by three cream puffs thrown from different directions simultaneously, then holding Larry's head up by his hair to get him hit by them; the use of the spring-loaded dummy hand as an artillery piece.

    Offline Kopfy2013

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #3 on: August 31, 2013, 05:49:54 PM »
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  • A very enjoyable short.  There's a lot of harmony in the short and it flows rather nicely.

    More outside shots of LA. You can see when the police and the lawyer have the Stooges a street sign for Cahuenga.

    I love the tackle of Moe and Larry and how the spring-loaded hand comes into play multiple times.

    Is there a Journal that discusses Hilda Title and her life?
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    Offline Shemp_Diesel

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #4 on: September 01, 2013, 07:27:44 AM »
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  • Very enjoyable short, in my top 10 of Curly episodes. As others have noted, it's nice to see Vernon Dent in his first meaty role in a stooge short & Symona Boniface as well.


    10 out of 10...
    Now you ask me if I believe a man can become a wolf. Well, if you mean can he take on the physical characteristics of an animal, no, it's fantastic. However, I do believe that most anything can happen to a man in his own mind.

    Offline JWF

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #5 on: September 01, 2013, 10:02:52 AM »
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  • Vernon Dent:  "Are you sure this cabinet will be in competent hands?"
    Curly:  "Soitenly!  We're all incompetent!"

    One of my favorite all time Stooge lines!

    I also like the fact that, as the boss is walking Vernon Dent out of the room after the above line, says "Mr. Morgan, We're not as dumb as we look around here".


    Offline Rich Finegan

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #6 on: September 01, 2013, 03:26:18 PM »
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  • A very enjoyable short... 
    Is there a Journal that discusses Hilda Title and her life?


    Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be much out there on Hilda Title.
    But watch for the first-ever in-depth detailed article/bio on another fan favorite, Phyllis Crane (including some never before published photos), in the upcoming Stooges Journal.

    Offline Big Chief Apumtagribonitz

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #7 on: September 01, 2013, 09:32:15 PM »
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  • Aaahh, Symona, Symona Symona...is there anyone in stooge history more underrated?  Over the course of the years, this woman was cream puffed, pied, slapped, stabbed ( in this one ), drenched, stripped ( at least to the extent of having her clothes shrunken to the point of humiliation by the drenching ), whipped-creamed, and exploded, and she took it all with a gusto equal to any of the male supporting cast.  Her character was always the same society matron, and when disaster hit, she Took It Big with the best of them.
         I don't believe she ever once got a screen credit, did she?  I watched these things endlessly as a kid, and I don't think I ever knew her name until I read it in Maltlin's book many years later.  I knew all the other regular's names, at least those who got credits.
         And with this in mind, I still have never heard her name pronounced, I've only read it.  I know she was first-generation American, her parents having been Italian immigrants, so does anybody out there know for sure whether her last name was pronounced Boniface, like it would read in English, or Boni-fah-chee, which I assume would be the Italian pronunciation?
         AAahh, Symona....

    Offline metaldams

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #8 on: September 01, 2013, 10:04:46 PM »
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  • Aaahh, Symona, Symona Symona...is there anyone in stooge history more underrated?  Over the course of the years, this woman was cream puffed, pied, slapped, stabbed ( in this one ), drenched, stripped ( at least to the extent of having her clothes shrunken to the point of humiliation by the drenching ), whipped-creamed, and exploded, and she took it all with a gusto equal to any of the male supporting cast.  Her character was always the same society matron, and when disaster hit, she Took It Big with the best of them.
         I don't believe she ever once got a screen credit, did she?  I watched these things endlessly as a kid, and I don't think I ever knew her name until I read it in Maltlin's book many years later.  I knew all the other regular's names, at least those who got credits.
         And with this in mind, I still have never heard her name pronounced, I've only read it.  I know she was first-generation American, her parents having been Italian immigrants, so does anybody out there know for sure whether her last name was pronounced Boniface, like it would read in English, or Boni-fah-chee, which I assume would be the Italian pronunciation?
         AAahh, Symona....

    Down boy!

    ....but seriously, you're a classier man than I.  I consider a pie in the behind an appropriate end to Hilda Title's Stooge career.  You simply love Symona.  I do too, of course, and I have no clue how to pronounce her last name either.  Any answer to this question would be appreciated.  I do rank Symona in the long term all time great Stooge supporting actors, along with with Bud, Vernon, Christine, and Emil.

    Offline metaldams

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #9 on: September 01, 2013, 10:12:18 PM »
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  • Here's a treat for Symona fans, a lobby card from future Stooge director Charley Chase's 1925 short THE CARETAKER'S DAUGHTER.  You can see a younger Symona Boniface in this picture, and the short itself is a great one if you ever get a chance to see it.


    Offline Big Chief Apumtagribonitz

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #10 on: September 01, 2013, 10:47:21 PM »
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  • Two other points:  do an A-B comparison with this cream puff fight and the clay fight from Pop Goes the Easel
    and see how much better-paced and less primitive-looking this one is.  The editing is better, the gags are better, there's little if any ad-libbing, and the dubbed-in background screaming helps a lot.
         Also, don't overthink the band-saw gag.  Larry is just frozen in horror, that's all.  The director probably said " hey, Larry, we can't figure anything for you here...just stand there frozen in horror."

    Offline JazzBill

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #11 on: September 02, 2013, 05:59:58 PM »
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  • What's not to like in this one? Great sight gags and plenty of good bits. One bit I'm a little confused on is when they tell Moe to put his right hand on his right hip, then tilt his head back and then Larry and Curly go "WOOO". This bit was done in an earlier short called Plane Nuts. In this short it was the boys with Bonnie Bonnell pulling it on Ted Healy. In my opinion it seems to be a little poke at gays. The short contains some of my favorite lesser known co-stars,  William J. Irving, Lou Davis and Jack Lipson. I thought Jack Lipsom and Billy Gilbert were one and the same for a long time. All in all I like this short a lot and I rate it a 9. 
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    Offline Dr. Hugo Gansamacher

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #12 on: September 02, 2013, 06:46:37 PM »
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  • Here's a treat for Symona fans, a lobby card from future Stooge director Charley Chase's 1925 short THE CARETAKER'S DAUGHTER.  You can see a younger Symona Boniface in this picture, and the short itself is a great one if you ever get a chance to see it.

    Is that her on the left? She looks pretty hot! Something I would not have expected.

    About the pronunciation of her name, I also wonder. It stands to reason that nobody would want to be called "Bony Face," so I think it has to be some approximation of the Italian pronunciation, in four syllables. But it could be any of "bo-nee-fah-chay" (the closest approximation), "bo-nee-fah-chee" (reducing the final vowel), "bon-uh-fay-see," "bon-uh-fah-chee," and so on.

    Offline metaldams

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #13 on: September 02, 2013, 06:54:27 PM »
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  • Is that her on the left? She looks pretty hot! Something I would not have expected.

    About the pronunciation of her name, I also wonder. It stands to reason that nobody would want to be called "Bony Face," so I think it has to be some approximation of the Italian pronunciation, in four syllables. But it could be any of "bo-nee-fah-chay" (the closest approximation), "bo-nee-fah-chee" (reducing the final vowel), "bon-uh-fay-see," "bon-uh-fah-chee," and so on.

    Well....second to left, that sure as heck ain't her with the painted on the mustache.   [pie]. Yeah, that's a 31 year old Symona Boniface, and according to imdb, her first film role.

    I always pronounce her name bon-ah-face, but I'm probably wrong.

    Offline BeAStooge

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #14 on: September 02, 2013, 07:38:59 PM »
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  • She ran an acting school in Hollywood during the 1940s.  Moe pushed his son Paul to try some acting classes.  As someone who knew her, when talking about her, Paul has pronounced her name "Bon-ah-face".

    Offline Big Chief Apumtagribonitz

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #15 on: September 03, 2013, 07:55:52 PM »
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  • That's good enough for me.

    Offline ManiacMan

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #16 on: December 12, 2013, 04:38:53 PM »
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  • One of the only Stooge shorts I skip every time I put in the DVD. It's got some great gags but overall it falls completely flat for me. Out of 10, I'd say 3. Like Restless Knights, it's boring. There's no other way I can really describe it.

    Offline BeatleShemp

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #17 on: December 13, 2013, 08:46:27 PM »
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  • Love, love, love this short. I loved how Larry uses what looks like Twinkies as binoculars and says, "They're all in direct range!" Everything is priceless in this short. I love when Curly is getting the roofing nails pulled out of his butt, and he's squirming about and Larry just slaps him. I always look for great Larry moments in Three Stooges shorts.

    Offline Larrys#1

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #18 on: December 16, 2013, 12:02:10 PM »
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  • A great episode. The beginning scene with the stooges ruining the cabinet was simply hilarious. Love the part where the stooges run away from Mr. Morgan and Mrs. Morgan goes spinning like crazy. And the cream puff fight at the end was great! This would have made a 10/10 in my book, but I found that the fashion show bit dragged on a little bit longer than it should have. So, I'm afraid that little quibble prevents me from giving it a perfect rating. Other than that, a excellent episode with great rewatchability!

    9.5/10

    Offline stoogerascalfan62

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #19 on: February 07, 2014, 09:45:48 AM »
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  • One thing I don't get is why a different mix of "Listen To The Mockingbird" is heard at the end. That has bothered me.

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #20 on: February 10, 2014, 11:51:50 AM »
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  • Boy oh boy; now this one is meaty!! I have so many thoughts on this one....

    First of all, a question. When is it the police's job to enforce wills? And there was a police escort when Vernon Dent delivers the cabinet to Romani's; even though Vern tells them to leave, shouldn't he follow up once the Stooges destroy the cabinet?

    Anyway, let me get down to business. First of all, I'd love a triangular chest of drawers! Also, the board-falling gag is monumental; it just misses our Curly, of course, but Moe sure as hell gets it. Does everyone think this was a real board? When our boys cut the cabinet in half and start slapping messy-ass blobs of glue all over it; yeah that's going to fool someone.  :-\ I roar every time I see this.

    Once they get to the gown shop, watch when I think it's Larry goes to kiss Eddie Laughton; very cute. Watch the salesgirl when Curly is showing Moe the mannequin's hand; she giggles when it slaps our Curly / Moe.

    What in creation is wrong with the creation? I love the dress that the woman is wearing and even with those freaking puckered bloomers she's wearing it still fits; having spent many years in retail getting clobbered by ignorant, cheap customers trying to return beauty items they used for a cash refund when none was allowed has made me bristle at this scene time and again. "Tape measure; the thing with the numbers!......smart girl...."

    Being a woman who watches the Stooges and a great fan of late 30s and 40s womenswear, I adore the fashion show. I love the dressing gown, I could do without the riding habit; I like the bathingsuit and I like the wedding gown! The woman in the wedding gown is a beast, though, and I don't agree with the weird wimple veil; yick.

    The cream puff fight is awesome; these upstanding women in fine clothes just getting pasted with cream puffs.....and I understand the production crew used to scrape up pie filling from the floors, nails and dirt and all sorts of crap in it, and put it in new pieplates for reuse in the fights; just imagine what these women were getting hit with. I love one woman; they probably told her to throw on three but the creampuff hit her on one and a half; awesome. And my final thought; the woman that says, "Boys, boys, boys! This is no way for gentlemen to act!" ..... that's got to be a man, baby!
     

    Offline Paul Pain

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #21 on: September 14, 2014, 11:37:04 AM »
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  • I was never a fan of this one as a youth... I must watch it sometime and reform my opinion.
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    Offline Signor Spumoni

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #22 on: January 08, 2015, 12:41:07 PM »
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  • Regarding Symona's surname:  I don't know how *she* pronounced Boniface, but my years in Roman Catholic schools (it's a saint's name) taught me to pronounce it "BAHN-ih-face."  [Even we Protestant students had to learn about saints and things.]

    I love watching Eddie Laughton's reaction when he meets the Stooges and Larry appears to be about to kiss him. 

    I ask myself if Vernon Dent's character was accustomed to hearing his wife scream, even in public.  How else to explain his calm tone when he asks, "Did you scream?" when she's pricked with a pin? 

    TiskaTaskaBaska, somewhere online in the past couple of years, I saw a picture of a real triangular chest of drawers.  It reminded me of the one in this short.  I don't know where it was being sold, but it seems to me it was made by a small, local business somewhere.  Also, the bride's wimple reminds me of a Dutch girl's traditional cap.  Was that a popular style then?

    I always notice the clumsy way Curly accidentally turns on the saw when Moe is chasing him.  Usually he's smoother at such things.

    I enjoy seeing Larry's horrified expression as the cabinet moves along and is halved.  And talk about clumsy, Moe slathers on that glue like mustard on a hot dog.  :)

    My favorite part might be the spring-action dummy glove hand which doubles as a pie catapult and a face-slapper.  I like the way Larry is sent up from behind the glove counter to "see if the coast is clear" for Moe.  He lies and says it is, then is hauled up by Moe to get what I'll call his "just desserts."

    Can anybody tell me what "pinsess soir" means?  Moe tells Curly to pin off the fabric from Symona's dress creation, and says that phrase, then Curly repeats it.  Is there a real French phrase like that?


    Offline JWF

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #23 on: January 09, 2015, 08:21:51 PM »
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  • Can anybody tell me what "pinsess soir" means?  Moe tells Curly to pin off the fabric from Symona's dress creation, and says that phrase, then Curly repeats it.  Is there a real French phrase like that?

    I always took it to be something like "Pincez soi"....which I believe means something like "Pinch it"....or, "You pinch it..."

    Offline Hollister56

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    Re: Slippery Silks (1936)
    « Reply #24 on: January 06, 2017, 04:11:04 AM »
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  • This has got so many great scenes and one of my favorites.

    During the fashion show when June Gittelson says, I would love lovely in that riding habit, and Curly says it would be difficult to tell which one is the horse.

    Moe says, very witty my partner.

    That is so funny and the look on the ladies faces sitting in the chairs in front of Moe and Curly.

    This one is too fun...............