Soitenly
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Men in Black (1934)  (Read 6364 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline stoogerascalfan62

  • Bonehead
  • **
  • Posts: 143
    • View Profile
Re: Men in Black (1934)
« Reply #25 on: May 01, 2017, 01:47:18 PM »
  • Publish
  • Someone on YouTube, when YT had an early Popeye cartoon with a different voice actress voicing Olive Oyl, claimed that one of "Men In Black"'s featured performers, Jeanie Roberts, voiced Olive. I don't think that was ever the case.

    Offline Umbrella Sam

    • Chucklehead
    • ***
    • Posts: 242
    • Gender: Male
      • View Profile
    Re: Men in Black (1934)
    « Reply #26 on: May 01, 2017, 02:14:33 PM »
  • Publish
  • Someone on YouTube, when YT had an early Popeye cartoon with a different voice actress voicing Olive Oyl, claimed that one of "Men In Black"'s featured performers, Jeanie Roberts, voiced Olive. I don't think that was ever the case.

    I agree, because the Popeye cartoons were never made in California. They were made in New York except for a brief period in the late 1930s/early 1940s in which they were made in Miami, Florida. For the majority of the New York cartoons, she was voiced by Mae Questel, while Margie Hines is believed to have voiced her in the Miami cartoons. Considering Roberts probably lived in Los Angeles, I highly doubt they would have been willing to spend the extra money to bring her out to Miami for recording sessions.

    Offline stoogerascalfan62

    • Bonehead
    • **
    • Posts: 143
      • View Profile
    Re: Men in Black (1934)
    « Reply #27 on: May 08, 2017, 01:33:54 PM »
  • Publish
  • According to Wikipedia, Bonnie Poe voiced Olive in the first few cartoons, particularly the Betty Boop one that brought the spinach-loving sailor to the big screen.

    Offline Umbrella Sam

    • Chucklehead
    • ***
    • Posts: 242
    • Gender: Male
      • View Profile
    Re: Men in Black (1934)
    « Reply #28 on: May 08, 2017, 03:50:37 PM »
  • Publish
  • After watching some live-action clips of her on YouTube, I think it's safe to say that Poe is indeed the voice of Betty in the first Popeye cartoon, which probably means that she was the voice of Olive Oyl in this and some of the earlier cartoons as well. It's hard to tell, considering that Olive Oyl's voice is lower in them, and I can't find any clips of Poe talking in her regular speaking voice (assuming she didn't actually talk like Betty in real life). It's probably not Questel, considering she always claimed that she had chosen to do the Zasu Pitts impression the first time she saw the storyboards for Olive Oyl.

    Offline Woe-ee-Woe-Woe80

    • Bonehead
    • **
    • Posts: 120
      • View Profile
    Re: Men in Black (1934)
    « Reply #29 on: November 24, 2017, 08:36:53 PM »
  • Publish
  • Easily the best of the 1934 shorts, I loved the stooges modes of transportation when they're on their way to help the patients such as a bicycle, a horse and go carts, I also loved the intercom constantly yelling out "Dr. Howard, Dr. Fine & Dr. Howard", Moe laughing when the nurse tells him that when she yelled at her boss for a raise and her losing her voice in the process and Larry flirting with one of the female nurses.

    Not quite a classic but definitely a great short that gets a 9/10.

    Offline archiezappa

    • Numbskull
    • ****
    • Posts: 910
    • Gender: Male
      • View Profile
    Re: Men in Black (1934)
    « Reply #30 on: December 21, 2017, 01:50:31 PM »
  • Publish
  • I watched this again this morning. So many funny moments. What if you met someone and he stuck his hand out to shake and introduced himself as Dr. Graves, president of Los Arms Hospital. That would be something!

    I love the opening theme. I wish they used that more often.

    Also, this episode is very forward thinking. Within the episode, there is no one actually paiging the Drs. It's an artificial intelligence that is at the heart of the PA system. The Three Stooges are fighting back against AI with their own guns, which, apparently, they had been concealed carrying the whole time. This scenario seems relevant to the struggles of today. Thoughts?