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Offline shemps#1

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#6: The Monkees
« on: December 01, 2004, 03:35:24 PM »
(NOTE: Music That Sucks is the correct opinion of the author. If your opinion differs, kindly remove your head from your ass.)

1964 was the year The Beatles' first movie A Hard Days Night debuted. Considered by many film and music historians as the best movie by a rock band, it was an instant hit. If you didn't bother to read the title of this thread AHDN is not the subject of this installment of Music That Sucks. Instead we will focus on the "rock group" that it inspired.

TV producers Bert Schneider and Bob Rafelson had a vision during their viewing of A Hard Days Night that would moisten the panties of 12 year old girls all over and haunt mankind for years to come. Inspired by the Fab Four's cheeky antics, Bert and Bob came up with the concept of a fictional "Beatles-like" band, and a show that would follow their wacky adventures. Yes kids, it's worse than it sounds. The duo put out ads in newspapers calling for "four folk and rock musicians". Hundreds auditioned, but only singer/songwriter Mike Nesmith won the job. The other "members" of this "rock band" were basically actors with little or no musical talent; Mickey Dolenz was the "drummer", Davy Jones the "singer", and Peter Tork the "bassist". They were called "The Monkees", which is obviously a rip-off on the play of words of "The Beatles".

The show debuted in the fall of 1966 and became a smash hit. If you can imagine watching A Hard Days Night over and over with third rate actors pretending to be The Beatles week in and week out. With just one actual musician in the group The Monkees obviously couldn't play their own instruments; familiar names such as Stephen Stills and Harry Nilsson would actually play the instruments on songs written by the likes of Neil Diamond, Carole King, and Gerry Coffin among others, while The Monkees would pose in front of the camera and pretend they know what they are doing.

Perhaps the saving grace for the "Pre-Fab Four" was that the real Beatles themselves were actually moving away from the pop sound that made them famous and going to a more adult, psychodelic route when The Monkees' show first aired. This meant that the principal audience for The Monkees was in about the 13 and under range. As a "musical group" The Monkees had many annoying hits, including three #1 singles ("Last Train To Clarksville", "I'm A Believer", "Daydream Believer"), and others that reached the top ten ("(I'm not your) Steppin' Stone" and "Pleasant Valley Sunday"). At one point The Monkees' records were outselling both The Beatles and Rolling Stones combined. Even those who are not Beatles or Stones fans have to agree that something was seriously wrong here. Perhaps it was the inoffensive cutesy pop that parents approved of, and were more willing to buy albums for their children; as opposed to the more trippy, drug-addled (and therefore cooler) tunes of The Monkees' contemporaries.

As they got more famous, The Monkees became more and more disheartened with the farce they were pulling on the pre-teen girls of America. In a move that upset producers, they came out of the proverbial closet and admitted the truth about their music. Most of their fans couldn't give a s**t less.

Eventually Tork, Dolenz, and Jones learned how create music on their own, and by 1967 the musicians behind the curtains were no more. They even went out on a major tour that year, featuring a virtually unknown future guitar god Jimi Hendrix as the open act. Imagine it, a crowd of ten year old girls and their parents, awaiting the cheerful sounds of The Monkees, and instead getting Purple Haze blasted in their eardrums. Jimi only lasted two shows before he and The Monkees mutually parted ways.

By 1968, with their star fading, The Monkees were making more of an attempt to shake their manufactured image. As has been proven many times since, this never works. They even came out with a psychodelic-influenced movie Head, directed by Jack Nicholson. Real "heads" in San Francisco and elsewhere just laughed at these posers, while at the same time the pre-teens became alienated. Soon after the TV series was cancelled, and the band split up as well.

During the 70's Mike Nesmith hosted a variety show and wrote the song "Different Drum" for Linda Rondstadt. In the mid-80's the group reunited, without Nesmith who was benefitting off of his mother's invention of liquid paper (i.e. White Out), and "busy" doing his own little projects. They broke up again in '89 and reunited again in '96, and continue to tour the oldies circuit, occasionally joined by Nesmith.

As you may have noticed, not much attention was paid to the actual music of The Monkees. Unlike other installments of MTS, I did not go through any sort of discography. That's because The Monkees were not about the music, but rather image; the early Beatles' image in particular. They would pave the way for manufactured s**t music to come: Partridge Family, New Kids on the Block, Milli Vanilli, Backstreet Boys, N Sync. The bands listed, and countless others, can thank The Monkees for the blueprint to their success. Maybe one day the rest of us will get the chance to publically stone these four asswipes, as well as the producers that created them, for unleashing the Pandora's Box that is manufactured pop music.

The Monkees; music...that sucks!
« Last Edit: February 27, 2009, 01:50:03 PM by shemps#1 »
"Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day; teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime; give a man religion and he will die praying for a fish." - Unknown

Offline busybuddy

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2009, 10:24:09 AM »
I have a slight problem with this one, and I know that this is all strictly opinion and for fun, but I have to stick up for one of my top ten favorite music acts of all time.

When the Monkees first began, there was never any thought to push them as an actual group. When the public became outraged when they discovered they didn't play their own instruments, it came as a bit of a surprise to the actors because they never actually said that they were a real band. They all naturally assumed that the television viewers knew that it was just a sitcom, not real life.

The move to become an actual group came from the two musically inclined members, Peter Tork and Mike Nesmith because they were told from day one that they would be able to participate in the recordings and song writing but never got the chance. Their first real live show was in Hawaii and after that came Headquarters, the first record that featured the actual Monkees and only a select few outside musicians. Headquarters is as good as any garage-rock album of the 60's and features some great songs such as You Told Me, For Pete's Sake, Sunny Girlfriend, You Just May Be The One,and Randy Scouse Git.

When it comes to labeling the Monkees as "bubblegum," there are only a handful of songs in their catalog that I would describe as bubblegum, such Cuddly Toy, Daydream Believer, (The Theme From) The Monkees, and a few others that I can't think of off the top of my head but I know are there. And although the Monkess didn't write 80% of their music, there are a thousand other acts that share that dishonor, such as the King himself. And when it comes to playing their own instruments on record, half the bands in the '60's used session players, such as The Beach Boys. What some people don't realize is that the Monkees had some of the greatest palyers of all time on their records, including: Glen Campbell, Leon Russell, Hal Blaine, Stephen Stills, and many players from Phil Spector's/Brian Wilson's wrecking crew. And as for songwriters, they were given the best in the business: Goffin and King, Neil Diamond, Boyce and Hart, Harry Nillson, and Monkee Mike Nesmith, who wrote some of the best songs in their repitoire and would have made a name for  himself, Monkees or no Monkees. So while one can say that they didn't like the idea of the Monkees, you can't argue that they didn't have a lot of good songs.

To prove how good the Monkees were, check out the following songs:
Sweet Young Thing, What Am I Doing Hangin' 'Round?, Take A Giant Step, (Look Out) Here Comes Tommorrow, Love Is Only Sleeping, She, Star Collector, Circle Sky, Valleri, Saturday's Child, and the above listed songs from Headquarters, then take it from there.

WARNING: STEER CLEAR OF 33 1/3 REVOLUTIONS PER MONKEE, THE ABSOLUTE WORST TV SPECIAL IN THE HISTORY OF THE MEDIUM. YOU'VE BEEN WARNED!!!
I think Birdie will go for that!

Offline shemps#1

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2009, 07:38:36 PM »
I sure can argue that the Monkees didn't have any good songs because they didn't. The Monkees were created solely to glom off of the popularity of the Beatles by a bunch of TV execs and for that very reason right there will never be taken seriously as a rock band. In essence they weren't a rock band at all, just a creation for television. It's when they tried to become a legitimate rock band that they ran afoul of me. If they had just kept to the tv show like the Partidge Family (don't mention Cassidy, he was the only one to branch out beyond the show musically) they wouldn't be here.

They came around at a time when music was changing and the Beatles in particular. Disappearing were the pop minded "mop-tops" and they moved on to a more psychedelic state while The Monkees and their handlers said "we'll fill that souless void and just do what they were doing". They didn't even going through the "parent hating" bullshit that the Beatles did, the parents loved them because they were "safe" in a time when the rest of modern rock was anything but. The Beatles were blazing new trails and The Monkees were just shadowing them. Even when the Monkees decided to "branch out" and "go psychedelic" it just felt like they were trying to mimic the Beatles.

There have been many Beatles mimics over the decades, and the Monkees were the most popular. If I want to listen to "Beatle-esque" music I'll listen to the Beatles themselves: they did it best.
"Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day; teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime; give a man religion and he will die praying for a fish." - Unknown

Offline OldFred

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2009, 08:06:58 PM »
There is so much wrong with this thread I don't even know where to begin. True, Bob Rafelson & Bert Schneider were the creators of the Monkees project, they were inspired by the Beatles and in particular the movie 'A Hard Day's Night' and the TV series was basically a TV version of the movie. Of the four chosen to play the group, two were actors with a background in music and two were actual musicians.

Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork both came from the L.A. music scene, with Tork coming out of the folkie movement in New York's Greenwich Village, rubbing elbows with the likes of Stephen Stills, Neil Young, the Mamas & the Papas and Bob Dylan. Tork in fact was the most musically experienced as he studied in a music conservatory and is considered the best musician in the group and can play multiple instruments and is extremely adept at all styles of music, be it classical, blues, rock, folk, etc. Tork's friend Stephen Stills had in fact auditioned for the Monkees series, but then decided not to do it. The producers liked Stills' looks and asked him if he knew anyone who resembled him. He suggested Peter as they both looked alike at the time and Peter went to the auditions under Stills' recommendation. 

Nesmith was very active in the L.A. music scene, acting as MC at the famous Troubadour club and was a member of the New Christy Minstrels and had recorded under the name of Michael Blessing for the Colpix label, a subsidiary of Columbia Pictures. Of the four members, he's the only one who actually saw the newspaper ad for the auditions.

Dolenz and Jones both were child actors. Micky played the part of Corky in the 1950's series 'Circus Boy', produced by Columbia Pitures/Screen Gems. Interesting to note that Irving Lippman who worked as cinematographer on 'Circus Boy' later went on to do the same chores on the Monkees TV series. Another interesting footnote is that Lippman had previously worked on some of the Three Stooges shorts. After 'Circus Boy' ended it's run Micky's parents, one of them actor George Dolenz, wisely 'retired' Micky so he could pursue a normal childhood. Micky later on studied to be an architect and on the side did acting jobs, appearing on Peyton Place and other shows, and also fronted his own band in L.A., the Missing Links, playing guitar. His agent arranged for Micky to audition for the Monkees series.

Davy Jones was a young actor on the British TV series 'Coronation Street' (which also boasted future 'Herman's Hermits' member Peter Noone), and Jones later went into musical theater, winning the role of the Artful Dodger in Lionel Bart's musical 'Oliver!', which eventually went to Broadway. Ironically, Davy and the cast of 'Oliver!' performed a scene from the show on the exact same Ed Sullivan show that featured the American debut of The Beatles. Davy's turn as the Dodger earned him a Tony nomination and won him a contract with Screen Gems which groomed him for a TV series that eventually got him signed to the Monkees project.

Future filmmaker Paul Mazursky and his partner Larry Tucker helped to develop the series and both appear in the Monkees TV pilot, Mazursky as a man on the street interviewer. Bob Rafelson directed some of the early episodes of the series and would later go on to become an accomplished director and producer, directing the classic Jack Nicholson film 'Five Easy Pieces'.

The four chosen Monkees were schooled in improvisational comedy, led by director James Frawley, who later directed the first 'Muppet Movie', as well as the Three Stooges TV bio-pic. Since the series was produced at Screen Gems, the TV subsidiary of Columbia Pictures, the Monkees were able to study some of the comedy films in the Columbia library, including the classic Three Stooges shorts.

Even though the group, in particular musicians Nesmith and Tork were promised an active role in creating the music for the series, because of a tight TV schedule, it just wasn't possible so music tracks were recorded in advance by some of the top session musicians in the business, the famed L.A. Wrecking Crew, whose members included Hal Blaine, Glen Campbell, Leon Russel among many, who also recorded with Frank Sinatra, Ray Charles, the Mamas & the Papas, the Beach Boys, the Byrds, in fact, pretty much everybody. The Monkees' vocals were later added to the final tracks. The same musicians also did all the music on the acclaimed Brian Wilson produced 'Pet Sounds', which just needed the Beach Boys harmonies over the finished tracks. This was a fact that was selectively overlooked when the Monkees were later accused of being a 'fake' band when pretty much everyone in the business worked this way.

The Monkees' recordings were supervised by Don Kirshner who provided the cream of his song writing stable with luminaries like Carol King & Gerry Goffin, Neil Diamond, Neil Sedaka, Jeff Barry, Carol Bayer-Sager, Paul Williams, and Tommy Boyce & Bobby Hart among others. Other song writers to contribute to the Monkees project included Harry Nilsson and Michael Murphy. Kirshner kept a tight reign on the music end of the project. The Monkees, in particualr Nesmith & Tork, rebelled and kept pushing for the group to be allowed to play and write the songs on their records. Dolenz & Jones joined in solidarity with the other two, and they both eventually developed into decent musicians themselves. Dolenz, who already played guitar, being a quick study was able to learn to play the drums by Peter Tork. Davy Jones also learned to play rhythm guitar, percussion, bass and keyboards. During the filming of the pilot episode when they were supposed to be playing a club band, they asked if the amps were live, and when they were assured that they were, they ripped into several Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis tunes and got the extras and crew dancing. An executive visiting the set remarked that he would have signed the group to a recording contract right on the spot. Nesmith did get several of his songs on the first two Monkees albums.

The Monkees did eventually gain creative control of their music, playing the music on the Nesmith penned 'The Girl I Knew Somewhere', that became the B-side of 'A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You'. The first album they recorded as a group was 'Headquarters', that featured several songs written by all four members of the group. The song Micky Dolenz wrote, 'Randy Scouse Git', chronicled the party that was held in their honor by The Beatles when The Monkees toured England in early 1967. The Beatles were fans of the TV series, John Lennon was quoted as being a big fan, and he likened the Monkees as being more like the Marx Brothers than the Beatles. Members of the Beatles would remain life-long friends with the Monkees throughout the years.

Ringo/Monkees Commercial


The Monkees would continue to write and produce their own music, but after 'Headquarters', they became more disenfranchised from each other, Tork in particular was disenchanted as he really wanted to be in a group. Their music became a little more experimental, getting away from the earlier 'bubble gum' style enforced by Kirshner. Stephen Stills and Neil Young both played sessions on some of the Monkees songs, Young in particular plays a blistering guitar solo on the Davy Jones penned song 'You and I' from the group's 'Instant Replay' album.

The TV series also reflected this experimentalism, becoming more surreal in the second season. Frank Zappa even appeared in an episode of the series. In considering a third season, the group didn't want to continue doing regular episodes but submitted an idea to the parent network NBC about doing a series of specials that mixed music with topical comedy. While the Monkees proposal was rejected, the idea did eventually take root as Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In.

Instead of continuing with the TV series, the Monkees along with Bob Rafelson, Bert Schneider and Jack Nicholson wrote the script to what would eventually become the Monkees only feature film 'Head'. Instead of a 90 minute Monkees episode, 'Head' is a surreal, psychedelic biography of the Monkees and was a statement by director Rafelson on the manipulation of the media. The film featured cameos by Ray Nitschke, Sonny Liston, Frank Zappa, Annette Funicello, Terri Garr, Toni Basil (who would later have a 80's hit with the song 'Mickey') and co-starred Victor Mature. There's even a brief cameo by Bob Rafelson, Jack Nicholson and Dennis Hopper pre-'Easy Rider', which was co-produced by Rafelson and Bert Schneider. While 'Head' was not a commercial success at the time, it later went on to become an acclaimed cult film favorite. Even folks who are not Monkees fans have an appreciation of 'Head' as pure cinema.

The commercial failure of 'Head' pretty much marked the end of the Monkees. Peter Tork stayed with the group long enough to tape the TV special '33 & 1/3 Revolutions per Monkee', produced by Jack Good who also produced the 1964 'Around The Beatles' TV special and the series 'Shindig'. Following the same concept as 'Head', the special traces the creation of the Monkees and the media manipulations by the powers that be as represented by Brian Auger and Julie Driscoll, and features special musical performances by Little Richard, Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis and Buddy Miles. The surreal special was pitted against the 1969 Oscars, so it didn't get much of an audience. The special is also a cult favorite among Monkees fans and its' musical sequences are very entertaining with innovative video effects. The sequences with the musical guests doing a melody of their classic 50's hits is particularly exciting.

After the special, Peter Tork left the group and the Monkees became a trio. They made guest appearances on shows like Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash, ironically 'Laugh-In', the Tonight Show among others. Having gained autonomy of their music, they continued to release recordings, though they were no longer topping the charts. A pity, since they were producing some really good music at the time. Nesmith was blossoming as a song writer and eventually he bought himself out of his Monkees contract and went onto a solo career that produced top 40 hits like 'Joanne' and 'Silver Moon' and recording several highly acclaimed albums that pioneered the field of Country Rock. Nesmith had already scored hits for other artists like Linda Ronstadt who recorded his song 'Different Drum' and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band who recorded Nesmith's 'Mary, Mary'. (In the 80's the rap band Run DMC would also record their own version of 'Mary, Mary'). Nesmith, whose mother invented Liquid Paper and which he would later inherit the fortune, became a pioneer of Music Video, developing it as a viable art form. Nesmith would become the first music artist to win a Grammy Award for Music Video for his 1982 long form video album 'Elephant Parts'. Nesmith is recognized in the industry as an important figure in the field.

While not sharing the same level of success as Nesmith, the other three Monkees have had various degrees of success as solo artists in the fields of music, theater and films. Dolenz in the 80's was a successful and respected director in British television and has appeared in several productions on Broadway, including 'Grease' and 'Aida' and is involved in the charity 'Broadway Cares'. Jones continued in theater, television and music as an all-round entertainer. Peter Tork continued in music and fronts his band Shoe Suede Blues which tours around the country to great audience appreciation.

In 1986, with a resurgence of the Monkees' popularity due to the TV series being shown on MTV (similar to how the Stooges' career was revived when their shorts were sold to television in the late '50's), Dolenz, Jones and Tork reunited and went on an extremely successful 20th anniversary reunion tour that was one of the top tours of 1986. Nesmith was unable to participate due to prior film commitments, but wished the other three well. He did join them for a memorable moment at the Greek Theater in September of that year, the first time all four Monkees performed together on-stage since 1968. The Monkees have done several reunion tours over the years, entertaining older fans while winning a new generation of younger fans. The last time all four Monkees toured together was in England in 1997. The four members have all gone on and enjoy their own individual successes, with their music recognized as Pop/Rock classics and their TV series as a precursor of music video. Still, they'll always be remembered as one of the classic Pop bands of the 60's, The Monkees.








The Monkees Reunited, 1986

Offline metaldams

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2009, 10:48:11 PM »
My very limited opinions on The Monkees.

- Used to watch the TV show as a kid all the time, but it's been 20 years or more since I've seen it.

- Don't have a deep knowledge of their music beyond the hits, but they made catchy pop singles.  "Last Train To Clarksville" is shamelessly derivative of "Paperback Writer," but if ya got to steal, steal from the best.


Offline OldFred

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2009, 06:00:41 AM »
Here's a fun little mash-up of the Beatles and the Monkees.

Paperback Believer

Offline Dunrobin

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2009, 07:00:59 AM »
My very limited opinions on The Monkees.

- Used to watch the TV show as a kid all the time, but it's been 20 years or more since I've seen it.

- Don't have a deep knowledge of their music beyond the hits, but they made catchy pop singles.  "Last Train To Clarksville" is shamelessly derivative of "Paperback Writer," but if ya got to steal, steal from the best.



Have ever seen their movie, Head, Doug?  It's an excellent psychedelic film (very drug-related), co-written and produced by Jack Nicholson, and unlike their TV schtick (which they mock continuously.)  It's become something of a cult classic.

[youtube=425,350]LD9f-x3fV-o[/youtube]

Here's a link to another clip from the movie: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xraeg_the-monkees-porpoise-song-from-head_music

Besides, how can you fault a movie that cameos Frank Zappa?

[youtube=425,350]JOI-SDYGviM[/youtube]

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2009, 07:36:10 AM »
Great Write-ups. Don't think anyone can deny them their place in pop history.  They were a new breed of TV generated for kids when they arrived home from school to watch. Competing along side Paul Revere and the Raiders (featuring Mark Lindsey).  As I've grown older I've picked up chords, rhythm's, vocal harmonies and other little parts of their songs that I like and hadn't noticed before, because  Davy Jones hair was always in the way.

Between the years of '64 to Woodstock, you have to really admire the changes that occurred in music.  And to think it was just 4 bugs from the UK that made it happen.

Great EBay item would be Nesmith's knit hat.
[youtube=425,350]vfYDnXMRmUs[/youtube]
[youtube=425,350]1ISEV3evXwc[/youtube]

Offline metaldams

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2009, 08:34:49 AM »
No I've never seen HEAD, but I agree, if Frank Zappa's got a cameo, it can't be all that bad!

Offline OldFred

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2009, 08:36:24 AM »
If I may make a recommendation, pick up the Monkees Anthology collection. It's a great overview of the Monkees musical output, featuring all of their hits as well as key album tracks and B-sides. The tracks from the movie 'Head' are particularly illuminating as it showcases the Monkees at their most creative.

http://www.amazon.com/Anthology-Monkees/dp/B0000063F8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1235657612&sr=1-1

Daydream Believer


Frank Zappa Cameo on Monkees TV Show
&feature=related

Head Promo


Monkees w/Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis & Little Richard from '33 & 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee'

Offline Desmond Of The Outer Sanctorum

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2009, 09:18:41 AM »
Frankly, I can't argue much with either the criticism or the praise directed at the Monkees; there's a lot of truth to both. I personally never got into them, although I have (and like most of the music on) the HEAD album. Not surprisingly, most of what's good about it has to do with people who aren't Davy or Mickey.

BTW, Davy wasn't completely without musical experience. He is probably the only Monkee who released a solo album before the Monkees started. It used to be one of the rarest & most potentially collectible records that nobody seems to have wanted!
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Offline FineBari3

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2009, 01:16:18 PM »
I discovered the Monkees almost precisely the same time as I discovered the Stooges!

1978 or 79, I was watching the local crap-VHF station, ch. 22. They never had anything on that was modern, and one day I was watching at my grandma's house. I recall that the Stooges were on right after the Monkees, and I just let the TV stay on the channel. (Why, I would have to get up to do that!)

Remember back then before cable, when the President was on, he was on every channel?!!!

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Offline Dunrobin

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2009, 01:57:02 PM »
Quote
Remember back then before cable, when the President was on, he was on every channel?!!!

Unfortunately, yes I do.  At least these days we have better things to watch than those lying scumbags.  I'd prefer being forced to sit through two hours of info-mercials (or even shoving toothpicks under a toenail or two) rather than sit through a politician's  speech.   ::)

Offline OldFred

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2009, 05:15:26 PM »
I discovered the Monkees almost precisely the same time as I discovered the Stooges!

1978 or 79, I was watching the local crap-VHF station, ch. 22. They never had anything on that was modern, and one day I was watching at my grandma's house. I recall that the Stooges were on right after the Monkees, and I just let the TV stay on the channel. (Why, I would have to get up to do that!)

It's interesting to note the many connections between the Three Stooges and The Monkees. Both were products of Columbia Pictures. I already noted that cinematographer Irving Lippman worked on the Stooges shorts, Micky Dolenz's pre-Monkees TV series 'Circus Boy', and later worked with Micky again on the Monkees series. The Monkees TV series and the movie 'Head' were filmed on the same Columbia lot as the Stooges shorts. I think if you carefully scan 'Head' you might recognize many of the sets that appeared in the Stooges comedies. And the Monkees' prior to filming the pilot and the series had access to and carefully studied the comedy films of the Stooges as well as the Marx Brothers. And James Frawley, who directed many of the Monkees' episodes, later went on to direct the 2000 Three Stooges tele-biography.

Who knew there'd be such a strong link between the Three Stooges and the Monkees?  [3stooges]






Offline hiramhorwitz

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2009, 05:48:40 PM »
Didn't Emil Sitka appear unbilled in one or two of The Monkees' episodes?  As a kid, I remember spotting him (as well as spotting Lon Chaney, Jr and a couple of other 40s players) and thinking "Wow -- they got someone famous in this episode -- the guy from the 3 Stooges!" 

Offline OldFred

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2009, 06:11:27 PM »
Didn't Emil Sitka appear unbilled in one or two of The Monkees' episodes?  As a kid, I remember spotting him (as well as spotting Lon Chaney, Jr and a couple of other 40s players) and thinking "Wow -- they got someone famous in this episode -- the guy from the 3 Stooges!" 

I'll have to check to see if Emil Sitka appeared in any Monkees episodes. Lon Chaney, Jr. did appear in an episode, 'Monkees In A Ghost Town', along with Rose Marie, who appeared in another episode with the group. Among other well known names who have appeared on the Monkees TV series include Hans Conreid, Carl Balentine, Liberace, Bobby Sherman, Mike Farrell, Vic Tayback, Monty Landis, Rip Taylor, Burgess Meredith, Julie Newmar, Deana Martin, Tim Buckley and Frank Zappa.


Offline BeAStooge

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2009, 06:22:30 PM »
Didn't Emil Sitka appear unbilled in one or two of The Monkees' episodes? 

No

Offline hiramhorwitz

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2009, 06:50:31 PM »
No

Maybe not, but I was pretty sure he appeared in at least one episode.  Back then, he seemed to pop up unbilled in a variety of ways in miscellaneous Screen Gems TV productions.  I know for certain that a photograph of him was shown in an episode of Dennis the Menace.  In this episode, he was identified as a boyfriend or penpal of one of the female "old maid" characters.  And I see on IMDB that he appeared in an episode of Circus Boy (the early Micky Dolenz show that was discussed)...so I'm still not 100% convinced he didn't appear on The Monkees.  That was right around the time that the The New 3 Stooges were being shown and I was pretty darn sure I knew what Emil looked like.

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2009, 07:00:07 PM »
Mousie Garner made it into one Monkees episode, Monkees A La Carte, as mobster B-B-B-Bennie the Bookmaker, specialty: "B-B-B-Bookmaking and Numbers".


How's that for stretching a Stooge connection!?  :laugh:
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Offline BeAStooge

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #19 on: February 26, 2009, 07:15:58 PM »
so I'm still not 100% convinced he didn't appear on The Monkees. 

Scott... Emil did not appear on THE MONKEES.

Offline hiramhorwitz

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #20 on: February 26, 2009, 07:26:11 PM »
Scott... Emil did not appear on THE MONKEES.

Okay -- if you say so, I believe it.

Offline OldFred

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2009, 07:38:39 PM »
Mousie Garner made it into one Monkees episode, Monkees A La Carte, as mobster B-B-B-Bennie the Bookmaker, specialty: "B-B-B-Bookmaking and Numbers".


How's that for stretching a Stooge connection!?  :laugh:

I forgot that Mousie was in a Monkees episode. Notch another up for the Stooges/Monkees connection!  :D

P.S.: I can concur that Emil never appeared in an episode of the Monkees. It's a possibility that he's being confused with Hans Conried.

The Monkees 'Words' w/Hans Conried


But, to keep it in a Stooges vein, here's a clip from 'Monkees a La Carte' with Mousie Garner
&feature=PlayList&p=FB2856ED95456170&playnext=1&index=63

And as an extra little bonus, here's a clip with Rose Marie featuring one of the Monkees best ballads.

Sometime In The Morning

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2009, 09:24:16 PM »
blah blah blah I like the Monkees blah.

Talk about verbose! I'm not even going to begin to read all of that shit. Whine all you want, I think the Monkees suck, hence the induction.
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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #23 on: February 26, 2009, 09:37:15 PM »
Talk about verbose! I'm not even going to begin to read all of that shit. Whine all you want, I think the Monkees suck, hence the induction.

LOL. Yeah, that was a bit too wordy.

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Re: #6: The Monkees
« Reply #24 on: February 26, 2009, 11:21:33 PM »
In fact, I'm going to delete it...this is Music That Sucks, not "write a counter-induction if you disagree". Really Fred, ease up.
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